Hourly concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been measured for 16 years, from 1998 to 2013, in a seaside town in central Italy. The seasonal trends of O3 and NO2 recorded in this period have been studied. Furthermore, we used the data collected during one year (2005), to define the characteristics of a multiple linear regression model and a neural network model. Both models are used to model the hourly O3 concentration, using, two scenarios: 1) in the first as inputs, only meteorological parameters and 2) in the second adding photochemical parameters at those of the first scenario. In order to evaluate the performance of the model four statistical criteria are used: correlation coefficient, fractional bias, normalized mean squared error and a factor of two. All the criteria show that the neural network gives better results, compared to the regression model, in all the model scenarios. Predictions of O3 have been carried out by many authors using a feed forward neural architecture. In this paper we show that a recurrent architecture significantly improves the performances of neural predictors. Using only the meteorological parameters as input, the recurrent architecture shows performance better than the multiple linear regression model that uses meteorological and photochemical data as input, making the neural network model with recurrent architecture a more useful tool in areas where only weather measurements are available. Finally, we used the neural network model to forecast the O3 hourly concentrations 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h ahead. The performances of the model in predicting O3 levels are discussed. Emphasis is given to the possibility of using the neural network model in operational ways in areas where only meteorological data are available, in order to predict O3 also in sites where it has not been measured yet.

Analysis of surface ozone using a recurrent neural network

DI CARLO, PIERO;
2015

Abstract

Hourly concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been measured for 16 years, from 1998 to 2013, in a seaside town in central Italy. The seasonal trends of O3 and NO2 recorded in this period have been studied. Furthermore, we used the data collected during one year (2005), to define the characteristics of a multiple linear regression model and a neural network model. Both models are used to model the hourly O3 concentration, using, two scenarios: 1) in the first as inputs, only meteorological parameters and 2) in the second adding photochemical parameters at those of the first scenario. In order to evaluate the performance of the model four statistical criteria are used: correlation coefficient, fractional bias, normalized mean squared error and a factor of two. All the criteria show that the neural network gives better results, compared to the regression model, in all the model scenarios. Predictions of O3 have been carried out by many authors using a feed forward neural architecture. In this paper we show that a recurrent architecture significantly improves the performances of neural predictors. Using only the meteorological parameters as input, the recurrent architecture shows performance better than the multiple linear regression model that uses meteorological and photochemical data as input, making the neural network model with recurrent architecture a more useful tool in areas where only weather measurements are available. Finally, we used the neural network model to forecast the O3 hourly concentrations 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h ahead. The performances of the model in predicting O3 levels are discussed. Emphasis is given to the possibility of using the neural network model in operational ways in areas where only meteorological data are available, in order to predict O3 also in sites where it has not been measured yet.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/10174
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