Fingerprints (FP), characteristic of humans, are impressions due to skin marks (ridges) on fingertips. Ridges are present on fingers/hands forming curved lines of different sizes/patterns. The point where a line stops or splits is defined typica' (their number/amount constitute identification patterns). FP are permanent and unique. This study compared FP patterns with cardiovascular risk factors: 7 main types of FP were used: 1. Arch: lines form waves from one site to the other side. 2. Tentarch: like arches but with a rising stick in the middle. 3. Loop: lines coming from one site returning in the middle to the same site. 4. Double loop: like loops but with two loops inside: one standing, one hanging. 5. Pocked loop: like the loop but with a small circle in the turning point. 6. Whorl: lines make circles. 7. Mixed figure: composed of different figures. There are two kinds of real typica: A. Ending line; B. Splitting lines (bifurcations). Several combinations may result. Ultrasound evaluation of carotid/femoral arteries in asymptomatic subjects. Arteries were evaluated with high-resolution ultrasound at the bifurcations. Four classes were defined: 1: normal intima-media (IMT) complex; 2: IMT thickening; 3: non-stenosing plaques (<50% stenosis); 4: stenosing plaque (>50%). Subjects in classes 1, 2, 3 were included into the analysis made comparing FP patterns and ultrasound. RESULTS: For each FP pattern: A. the main proportion of subjects with cardiovacular risk factors (91%) had arches (41.2%) and loops (either single, 38.2% or double 11.7% for a total of 49.9%). B. The remaining classes were statistically less important. C. The number of ridges per square mm was comparable in all pattern classes. D. The analysis of typica and other ridges characteristics requires a more elaborated system. Future research must define simple, low cost screening methods for preselection of subjects at higher cardiovascular risk or for exclusion of low risk subjects. The evaluation of fingerprint pattern may be useful to define risk groups.

Fingerprints and cardiovascular risk. The San Valentino fingerprint vascular screening project (SanVal/FP)

Ledda, A.;Vinciguerra, G.;GIZZI, GERMANA
2008-01-01

Abstract

Fingerprints (FP), characteristic of humans, are impressions due to skin marks (ridges) on fingertips. Ridges are present on fingers/hands forming curved lines of different sizes/patterns. The point where a line stops or splits is defined typica' (their number/amount constitute identification patterns). FP are permanent and unique. This study compared FP patterns with cardiovascular risk factors: 7 main types of FP were used: 1. Arch: lines form waves from one site to the other side. 2. Tentarch: like arches but with a rising stick in the middle. 3. Loop: lines coming from one site returning in the middle to the same site. 4. Double loop: like loops but with two loops inside: one standing, one hanging. 5. Pocked loop: like the loop but with a small circle in the turning point. 6. Whorl: lines make circles. 7. Mixed figure: composed of different figures. There are two kinds of real typica: A. Ending line; B. Splitting lines (bifurcations). Several combinations may result. Ultrasound evaluation of carotid/femoral arteries in asymptomatic subjects. Arteries were evaluated with high-resolution ultrasound at the bifurcations. Four classes were defined: 1: normal intima-media (IMT) complex; 2: IMT thickening; 3: non-stenosing plaques (<50% stenosis); 4: stenosing plaque (>50%). Subjects in classes 1, 2, 3 were included into the analysis made comparing FP patterns and ultrasound. RESULTS: For each FP pattern: A. the main proportion of subjects with cardiovacular risk factors (91%) had arches (41.2%) and loops (either single, 38.2% or double 11.7% for a total of 49.9%). B. The remaining classes were statistically less important. C. The number of ridges per square mm was comparable in all pattern classes. D. The analysis of typica and other ridges characteristics requires a more elaborated system. Future research must define simple, low cost screening methods for preselection of subjects at higher cardiovascular risk or for exclusion of low risk subjects. The evaluation of fingerprint pattern may be useful to define risk groups.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/123094
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