Increasing evidence suggests that uric acid (UA) is a relevant risk factor for arteriolosclerosis and recent studies have demonstrated the positive relationship between UA concentrations and the severity of leukoaraiosis. However, the association between lacunar infarcts (LI) and UA levels has seldom been reported in the literature. The aim of our study was to assess whether serum UA levels may be related to the presence of LI. We recruited 242 patients (113 males and 129 females, aged 82.83 ± 6.49 years) from our Geriatric Department for whom CAT scans (CT) were available. Clinical and laboratory data was collected. Patients CT images were examined to identify the presence, the size, the number, and the location of LI. LI without neurological symptoms were considered silent LI. Serum UA levels were found to be positively associated with the presence (p = 0.0001), the number (p = 0.001), the size (p = 0.001), and the location of LI in the basal ganglia (p = 0.0038), the deep white matter (DWM) (p < 0.0001), and the pons (p = 0.0156). A significant association was also found between UA and silent LI (p = 0.0002). The prevalence of LI increased starting from UA levels of 5.7 mg/dl. Stepwise multiple regression analysis confirmed that UA was independently related with the presence, the number, the size, LI in the basal ganglia, the DWM, the pons, and with silent LI. Our study suggests a positive association between UA levels and LI, which is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. This data suggests that UA plays an influential role on the physiopathology of LI and could represent a potential target to prevent cerebral microinfarcts.

Association Between the Serum Uric Acid Levels and Lacunar Infarcts in the Elderly

Crosta, F.
;
Cimini, A.;Grassi, D.;Ferri, C.;Marini, C.;Desideri, G.
2018-01-01

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that uric acid (UA) is a relevant risk factor for arteriolosclerosis and recent studies have demonstrated the positive relationship between UA concentrations and the severity of leukoaraiosis. However, the association between lacunar infarcts (LI) and UA levels has seldom been reported in the literature. The aim of our study was to assess whether serum UA levels may be related to the presence of LI. We recruited 242 patients (113 males and 129 females, aged 82.83 ± 6.49 years) from our Geriatric Department for whom CAT scans (CT) were available. Clinical and laboratory data was collected. Patients CT images were examined to identify the presence, the size, the number, and the location of LI. LI without neurological symptoms were considered silent LI. Serum UA levels were found to be positively associated with the presence (p = 0.0001), the number (p = 0.001), the size (p = 0.001), and the location of LI in the basal ganglia (p = 0.0038), the deep white matter (DWM) (p < 0.0001), and the pons (p = 0.0156). A significant association was also found between UA and silent LI (p = 0.0002). The prevalence of LI increased starting from UA levels of 5.7 mg/dl. Stepwise multiple regression analysis confirmed that UA was independently related with the presence, the number, the size, LI in the basal ganglia, the DWM, the pons, and with silent LI. Our study suggests a positive association between UA levels and LI, which is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. This data suggests that UA plays an influential role on the physiopathology of LI and could represent a potential target to prevent cerebral microinfarcts.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Crosta2018_Article_AssociationBetweenTheSerumUric.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Dominio pubblico
Dimensione 393.45 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
393.45 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/126167
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 15
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
social impact