Background: Some studies suggested that after abdominal trauma, postoperative infections are associated with bacterial translocation, whereas others have not replicated these findings. We have assessed the bacterial translocation and postoperative infections in patients undergoing splenectomy after abdominal trauma, using a very homogeneous study population. Methods: We consecutively studied, in a prospective observational clinical study, 125 patients who required urgent surgical treatment (splenectomy) following blunt abdominal trauma. For bacterial translocation identification, tissue samples were taken from liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Postoperative infectious complications in these patients were registered, confirmed by a positive culture obtained from the septic focus. Associations between clinical variables, bacterial translocation presence, and postoperative infection development were established. Results: Bacterial translocation was detected in 47 (37.6%) patients. Postoperative infections were present in 29 (23.2%) patients. A significant statistical difference was found between postoperative infections in patients with bacterial translocation evidence (22 of 47 patients: 46.8%) in comparison with patients without bacterial translocation (7 of 78 patients: 8.9%) (P < 0.05). After multivariate adjustment analysis: a) the bleeding ≥ 1500 mL was significantly associated with the risk of bacterial translocation and, b) bacterial translocation was significantly associated with the risk of postoperative infections. Bacterial strains isolated from infection sites were the same as those cultured in MLNs in 48.3% of the cases (n = 14 of 29). Conclusions: There is higher risk of bacterial translocation in patients who required urgent surgical treatment (splenectomy) following blunt abdominal trauma and it is associated with a significant higher number of postoperative infections.

Does bacterial translocation influence the postoperative infections in splenectomized patients after abdominal trauma?

SCHIETROMA, Mario;CARLEI, Francesco;AMICUCCI, Gianfranco
2018

Abstract

Background: Some studies suggested that after abdominal trauma, postoperative infections are associated with bacterial translocation, whereas others have not replicated these findings. We have assessed the bacterial translocation and postoperative infections in patients undergoing splenectomy after abdominal trauma, using a very homogeneous study population. Methods: We consecutively studied, in a prospective observational clinical study, 125 patients who required urgent surgical treatment (splenectomy) following blunt abdominal trauma. For bacterial translocation identification, tissue samples were taken from liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs). Postoperative infectious complications in these patients were registered, confirmed by a positive culture obtained from the septic focus. Associations between clinical variables, bacterial translocation presence, and postoperative infection development were established. Results: Bacterial translocation was detected in 47 (37.6%) patients. Postoperative infections were present in 29 (23.2%) patients. A significant statistical difference was found between postoperative infections in patients with bacterial translocation evidence (22 of 47 patients: 46.8%) in comparison with patients without bacterial translocation (7 of 78 patients: 8.9%) (P < 0.05). After multivariate adjustment analysis: a) the bleeding ≥ 1500 mL was significantly associated with the risk of bacterial translocation and, b) bacterial translocation was significantly associated with the risk of postoperative infections. Bacterial strains isolated from infection sites were the same as those cultured in MLNs in 48.3% of the cases (n = 14 of 29). Conclusions: There is higher risk of bacterial translocation in patients who required urgent surgical treatment (splenectomy) following blunt abdominal trauma and it is associated with a significant higher number of postoperative infections.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/126397
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact