Purpose: Osteocalcin (OCN), released from the bone matrix during the resorption phase, in its undercarboxylated form, stimulates testosterone (T) biosynthesis in mouse and a loss-of-function mutation of its receptor was associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in humans. Nevertheless, when population-based studies have explored the OCN-T association, conflicting results have been reported. Hypothesizing that the evidence of a positive association between OCN and T could have been hindered by the preeminent role of a well-functioning hypothalamus–pituitary axis in promoting T biosynthesis, we explored this association in men with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), exhibiting high prevalence of non-hypergonadotropic androgen deficiency. Methods: Fifty-five consecutive men with chronic SCI underwent clinical/biochemical evaluations, including measurements of total T (TT), OCN and 25(OH)D levels. Free T (FT) levels were calculated by the Vermeulen formula. Comorbidity was scored by Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Results: A biochemical androgen deficiency (TT < 300 ng/dL) was observed in 15 patients (27.3%). TT was positively correlated with OCN, 25(OH)D and leisure time physical activity and negatively correlated with age, BMI and CCI. OCN was also positively correlated with calculated FT and negatively correlated with BMI and HOMA-IR. At the multiple linear regression analyses, a positive association of OCN with TT and calculated FT persisted after adjustment for confounders. Conclusions: The positive association here found between OCN and T levels in men with chronic SCI reinforces the notion that a bone–testis axis is also functioning in humans and suggests that it can be unmasked when the preeminent hypothalamic–pituitary regulation of T production is impaired.

Can the positive association of osteocalcin with testosterone be unmasked when the preeminent hypothalamic–pituitary regulation of testosterone production is impaired? The model of spinal cord injury

Barbonetti, A.;D’Andrea, S.;Martorella, A.;Francavilla, S.;Francavilla, F.
2019

Abstract

Purpose: Osteocalcin (OCN), released from the bone matrix during the resorption phase, in its undercarboxylated form, stimulates testosterone (T) biosynthesis in mouse and a loss-of-function mutation of its receptor was associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in humans. Nevertheless, when population-based studies have explored the OCN-T association, conflicting results have been reported. Hypothesizing that the evidence of a positive association between OCN and T could have been hindered by the preeminent role of a well-functioning hypothalamus–pituitary axis in promoting T biosynthesis, we explored this association in men with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI), exhibiting high prevalence of non-hypergonadotropic androgen deficiency. Methods: Fifty-five consecutive men with chronic SCI underwent clinical/biochemical evaluations, including measurements of total T (TT), OCN and 25(OH)D levels. Free T (FT) levels were calculated by the Vermeulen formula. Comorbidity was scored by Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Results: A biochemical androgen deficiency (TT < 300 ng/dL) was observed in 15 patients (27.3%). TT was positively correlated with OCN, 25(OH)D and leisure time physical activity and negatively correlated with age, BMI and CCI. OCN was also positively correlated with calculated FT and negatively correlated with BMI and HOMA-IR. At the multiple linear regression analyses, a positive association of OCN with TT and calculated FT persisted after adjustment for confounders. Conclusions: The positive association here found between OCN and T levels in men with chronic SCI reinforces the notion that a bone–testis axis is also functioning in humans and suggests that it can be unmasked when the preeminent hypothalamic–pituitary regulation of T production is impaired.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/131032
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