The clinical use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing or deprived of leukocytes remains a subject of debate and a controversial issue. It is not yet clear whether leukocyte content has a positive or negative effect on tissue healing processes. Several studies, conducted mainly in the orthopedic field, support the use of leukocyte-poor (LP) PRP, whereas other studies have not identified any significant differences between the use of LP and leukocyte-rich PRP. In the present study, the role of leukocytes contained in PRP was assessed to verify their in vitro effect on fibroblasts and endothelial cells, which have a leading role in the biological processes associated with wound healing (including angiogenesis and matrix remodeling). The original sample of PRP was divided into two aliquots, one of which remained unaltered, while the other was deprived of leukocytes. The two aliquots were used in in vitro tests in order to verify the effects of leukocytes on proliferation, wound healing and tube formation, and in molecular analyses of growth factor and enzyme content. The present results highlighted a substantial overlap between the two formulations. This may be explained by similar levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, thrombospondin-1, interferon-γ, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, -AA and -B, tumor growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor 7 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and enzymes (gelatinases and plasminogen activators) in the two formulations. These results support the hypothesis that the ability of the PRP to affect the in vitro biological response of endothelial cells and fibroblasts does not rely on the presence of leukocytes.

Leukocyte depletion does not affect the in vitro healing ability of platelet rich plasma

Giusti ,Ilaria;D'Ascenzo, Sandra;Palumbo, Paola;Dolo, Vincenza
2018

Abstract

The clinical use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing or deprived of leukocytes remains a subject of debate and a controversial issue. It is not yet clear whether leukocyte content has a positive or negative effect on tissue healing processes. Several studies, conducted mainly in the orthopedic field, support the use of leukocyte-poor (LP) PRP, whereas other studies have not identified any significant differences between the use of LP and leukocyte-rich PRP. In the present study, the role of leukocytes contained in PRP was assessed to verify their in vitro effect on fibroblasts and endothelial cells, which have a leading role in the biological processes associated with wound healing (including angiogenesis and matrix remodeling). The original sample of PRP was divided into two aliquots, one of which remained unaltered, while the other was deprived of leukocytes. The two aliquots were used in in vitro tests in order to verify the effects of leukocytes on proliferation, wound healing and tube formation, and in molecular analyses of growth factor and enzyme content. The present results highlighted a substantial overlap between the two formulations. This may be explained by similar levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor, thrombospondin-1, interferon-γ, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, -AA and -B, tumor growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor 7 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and enzymes (gelatinases and plasminogen activators) in the two formulations. These results support the hypothesis that the ability of the PRP to affect the in vitro biological response of endothelial cells and fibroblasts does not rely on the presence of leukocytes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/131268
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