Mental imagery and visual perception rely on the same content-dependent brain areas in the high-level visual cortex (HVC). However, little is known about dynamic mechanisms in these areas during imagery and perception. Here we disentangled local and inter-regional dynamic mechanisms underlying imagery and perception in the HVC and the hippocampus (HC), a key region for memory retrieval during imagery. Nineteen healthy participants watched or imagined a familiar scene or face during fMRI acquisition. The neural code for familiar landmarks and faces was distributed across the HVC and the HC, although with a different representational structure, and generalized across imagery and perception. However, different regional adaptation effects and inter-regional functional couplings were detected for faces and landmarks during imagery and perception. The left PPA showed opposite adaptation effects, with activity suppression following repeated observation of landmarks, but enhancement following repeated imagery of landmarks. Also, functional coupling between content-dependent brain areas of the HVC and HC changed as a function of task and content. These findings provide important information about the dynamic networks underlying imagery and perception in the HVC and shed some light upon the thin line between imagery and perception which has characterized the neuropsychological debates on mental imagery.

The dynamic contribution of the high-level visual cortex to imagery and perception

PICCARDI, L.;
2019

Abstract

Mental imagery and visual perception rely on the same content-dependent brain areas in the high-level visual cortex (HVC). However, little is known about dynamic mechanisms in these areas during imagery and perception. Here we disentangled local and inter-regional dynamic mechanisms underlying imagery and perception in the HVC and the hippocampus (HC), a key region for memory retrieval during imagery. Nineteen healthy participants watched or imagined a familiar scene or face during fMRI acquisition. The neural code for familiar landmarks and faces was distributed across the HVC and the HC, although with a different representational structure, and generalized across imagery and perception. However, different regional adaptation effects and inter-regional functional couplings were detected for faces and landmarks during imagery and perception. The left PPA showed opposite adaptation effects, with activity suppression following repeated observation of landmarks, but enhancement following repeated imagery of landmarks. Also, functional coupling between content-dependent brain areas of the HVC and HC changed as a function of task and content. These findings provide important information about the dynamic networks underlying imagery and perception in the HVC and shed some light upon the thin line between imagery and perception which has characterized the neuropsychological debates on mental imagery.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Boccia et al., 2019 HBM.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: articolo principale
Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 1.59 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.59 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/131486
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 11
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 11
social impact