In recent years, numerous studies have supported the use of topical blood components to improve wound healing and tissue regeneration. Platelet gel (PG), a hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets (PLTs) and cryoprecipitate,1 is currently being used clinically in reconstructive, cosmetic, orthopedic, cardiovascular, oral maxillofacial, and dermatologic surgery in an attempt to improve tissue healing.2,3 PLTs have concentrated levels of naturally occurring growth factors and other substances that have the potential to accelerate tissue repair4-6 by influencing several cellular processes including chemotaxis, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, angiogenesis, matrix deposition, and tissue remodeling.7,8 Previous studies have demonstrated that the healing process might be accelerated by the use of PG. Compared with lesions of patients treated by conventional methods, the sternal dehiscent wounds and skin necrotic ulcers of patients treated with PG recovered more rapidly.9 Moreover, patients treated by partial mandibulectomies for malignant tumors experienced satisfactory mandibular reconstructions when PLT-rich plasma was combined with autologous bone grafts.10 Despite the promising clinical results, PG use has proceeded in a totally empirical way, mainly grounding on experience of individual doctors, and the most effective PG concentration to promote wound healing has not yet been determined. In this study, the effects of PG-released supernatant at different concentrations on angiogenesis (process involved in tissue reparation mechanism) were investigated using different in vitro assays (proliferation, migration, invasion, cord formation, and wound healing).

Identification of an optimal concentration of platelet gel for promoting angiogenesis in human endothelial cells

GIUSTI I;DOLO, VINCENZA
2009

Abstract

In recent years, numerous studies have supported the use of topical blood components to improve wound healing and tissue regeneration. Platelet gel (PG), a hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets (PLTs) and cryoprecipitate,1 is currently being used clinically in reconstructive, cosmetic, orthopedic, cardiovascular, oral maxillofacial, and dermatologic surgery in an attempt to improve tissue healing.2,3 PLTs have concentrated levels of naturally occurring growth factors and other substances that have the potential to accelerate tissue repair4-6 by influencing several cellular processes including chemotaxis, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, angiogenesis, matrix deposition, and tissue remodeling.7,8 Previous studies have demonstrated that the healing process might be accelerated by the use of PG. Compared with lesions of patients treated by conventional methods, the sternal dehiscent wounds and skin necrotic ulcers of patients treated with PG recovered more rapidly.9 Moreover, patients treated by partial mandibulectomies for malignant tumors experienced satisfactory mandibular reconstructions when PLT-rich plasma was combined with autologous bone grafts.10 Despite the promising clinical results, PG use has proceeded in a totally empirical way, mainly grounding on experience of individual doctors, and the most effective PG concentration to promote wound healing has not yet been determined. In this study, the effects of PG-released supernatant at different concentrations on angiogenesis (process involved in tissue reparation mechanism) were investigated using different in vitro assays (proliferation, migration, invasion, cord formation, and wound healing).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/13232
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