Objective: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) represent a common feature of psychoses, in particular of patients with Schizophrenia. They are defined as "the auditory perception of speech in the absence of external stimuli" but are better known as "voices". The "voices" are personified, intrusive, critical, and frightening, becoming a source of distress (Table II). The purpose of this review is to describe the phenomenology of this symptom, so to gain a better understanding of AVH. Epidemiological and neurocognitive approaches allow us both a quantification of this phenomenon and a pathophysiological interpretation of AVH. Finally, neuroimaging data focus on the neuroanatomical structures related to "voices". Methods: A literature research was conducted, including PUBMED as source. This search has then been expanded through reference lists and other available sources regarding AVH. Results: Current data suggest that AVH are a core symptom of Schizophrenia, but they are not specific for this disorder. In fact they occur in the general population and in patients with several brain disorders (Table IV). Regarding pathophysiology, although it is accepted that AVH are the result of internal events misattributed to an external source, there is less agreement about the cognitive process that could explain this misattribution (Fig. 2). Conclusions: Although AVH are seen only as a symptom, recent evidence point to them as the result of abnormalities in perceptual processes and in cognitive functions (Tables V, VI). It is hoped that further investigations may unveil their pathophysiology and impact on mental activities.

Psicopatologia delle alluncinazioni verbali uditive

Riccardi, I.;Rossi, Alessandro
2008

Abstract

Objective: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) represent a common feature of psychoses, in particular of patients with Schizophrenia. They are defined as "the auditory perception of speech in the absence of external stimuli" but are better known as "voices". The "voices" are personified, intrusive, critical, and frightening, becoming a source of distress (Table II). The purpose of this review is to describe the phenomenology of this symptom, so to gain a better understanding of AVH. Epidemiological and neurocognitive approaches allow us both a quantification of this phenomenon and a pathophysiological interpretation of AVH. Finally, neuroimaging data focus on the neuroanatomical structures related to "voices". Methods: A literature research was conducted, including PUBMED as source. This search has then been expanded through reference lists and other available sources regarding AVH. Results: Current data suggest that AVH are a core symptom of Schizophrenia, but they are not specific for this disorder. In fact they occur in the general population and in patients with several brain disorders (Table IV). Regarding pathophysiology, although it is accepted that AVH are the result of internal events misattributed to an external source, there is less agreement about the cognitive process that could explain this misattribution (Fig. 2). Conclusions: Although AVH are seen only as a symptom, recent evidence point to them as the result of abnormalities in perceptual processes and in cognitive functions (Tables V, VI). It is hoped that further investigations may unveil their pathophysiology and impact on mental activities.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/133188
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