Do inequality, unemployment and deterrence affect crime over the long run? Regional Studies. This paper investigates the long-run relationship between crime, inequality, unemployment and deterrence using US state-level data from 1978 to 2013. The novelty is to use non-stationary panels with a factor structure. The results show that: (1) a crime-theoretical model fits the long-run relationship well; (2) income inequality and unemployment have a positive impact on crime, whereas that of deterrence is negative; (3) the effect of income inequality on crime is larger when inequality is measured on a wider population proportion; and (4) property crime is generally highly sensitive to the deterrence effect of police.

Do inequality, unemployment and deterrence affect crime over the long run?

Costantini, Mauro;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Do inequality, unemployment and deterrence affect crime over the long run? Regional Studies. This paper investigates the long-run relationship between crime, inequality, unemployment and deterrence using US state-level data from 1978 to 2013. The novelty is to use non-stationary panels with a factor structure. The results show that: (1) a crime-theoretical model fits the long-run relationship well; (2) income inequality and unemployment have a positive impact on crime, whereas that of deterrence is negative; (3) the effect of income inequality on crime is larger when inequality is measured on a wider population proportion; and (4) property crime is generally highly sensitive to the deterrence effect of police.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/135920
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