Quantile mapping (QM) represents a common post-processing technique used to connect climate simulations to impact studies at different spatial scales. Depending on the simulation-observation spatial scale mismatch, QM can be used for two different applications. The first application uses only the bias correction component, establishing transfer functions between observations and simulations at similar spatial scales. The second application includes a statistical downscaling component when point-scale observations are considered. However, knowledge of alterations to climate change signal (CCS) resulting from these two applications is limited. This study investigates QM impacts on the original temperature and precipitation CCSs when applied according to a bias correction only (BC-only) and a bias correction plus downscaling (BC + DS) application over reference stations in Central Italy. BC-only application is used to adjust regional climate model (RCM) simulations having the same resolution as the observation grid. QM BC + DS application adjusts the same simulations to point-wise observations. QM applications alter CCS mainly for temperature. BC-only application produces a CCS of the median similar to 1 degrees C lower than the original (similar to 4.5 degrees C). BC + DS application produces CCS closer to the original, except over the summer 95th percentile, where substantial amplification of the original CCS resulted. The impacts of the two applications are connected to the ratio between the observed and the simulated standard deviation (STD) of the calibration period. For the precipitation, original CCS is essentially preserved in both applications. Yet, calibration period STD ratio cannot predict QM impact on the precipitation CCS when simulated STD and mean are similarly misrepresented.

Impact of bias correction and downscaling through quantile mapping on simulated climate change signal: a case study over Central Italy

Sangelantoni L.
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Quantile mapping (QM) represents a common post-processing technique used to connect climate simulations to impact studies at different spatial scales. Depending on the simulation-observation spatial scale mismatch, QM can be used for two different applications. The first application uses only the bias correction component, establishing transfer functions between observations and simulations at similar spatial scales. The second application includes a statistical downscaling component when point-scale observations are considered. However, knowledge of alterations to climate change signal (CCS) resulting from these two applications is limited. This study investigates QM impacts on the original temperature and precipitation CCSs when applied according to a bias correction only (BC-only) and a bias correction plus downscaling (BC + DS) application over reference stations in Central Italy. BC-only application is used to adjust regional climate model (RCM) simulations having the same resolution as the observation grid. QM BC + DS application adjusts the same simulations to point-wise observations. QM applications alter CCS mainly for temperature. BC-only application produces a CCS of the median similar to 1 degrees C lower than the original (similar to 4.5 degrees C). BC + DS application produces CCS closer to the original, except over the summer 95th percentile, where substantial amplification of the original CCS resulted. The impacts of the two applications are connected to the ratio between the observed and the simulated standard deviation (STD) of the calibration period. For the precipitation, original CCS is essentially preserved in both applications. Yet, calibration period STD ratio cannot predict QM impact on the precipitation CCS when simulated STD and mean are similarly misrepresented.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/139039
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