The classical, hormonal actions of Vitamin D are related to mineral metabolism and skeletal health. Vitamin D enhances intestinal calcium and phosphate absorption, stimulates osteoclast differentiation and calcium resorption from bone and promotes mineralization of the bone matrix. First evidence for the positive effect of Vitamin D intake for human health came from early studies on rickets and osteomalacia. Over the last decade, the perspective on how Vitamin D influences human health has changed dramatically based on the finding that the Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) and the Vitamin D activating enzyme 1-α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) are expressed in many cell types which are not involved in bone and mineral metabolism, such as intestine, pancreas, prostate and cells of the immune system. This suggests an important impact of Vitamin D on a much wider aspect of human health than previously known. Especially in the field of human immunology, the extra-renal synthesis of the active metabolite calcitriol—1,25(OH)2D— by immune cells and peripheral tissues has been proposed to have immunomodulatory properties similar to locally active cytokines. Vitamin D plays several roles in the body, influencing bone health as well as serum calcium and phosphate levels. Furthermore, Vitamin D may modify immune function, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis [1,2].

Rethinking the “Sunshine” Vitamin

DE MARTINIS, MASSIMO MARIA MARCELLO;GINALDI, Lia
2014-01-01

Abstract

The classical, hormonal actions of Vitamin D are related to mineral metabolism and skeletal health. Vitamin D enhances intestinal calcium and phosphate absorption, stimulates osteoclast differentiation and calcium resorption from bone and promotes mineralization of the bone matrix. First evidence for the positive effect of Vitamin D intake for human health came from early studies on rickets and osteomalacia. Over the last decade, the perspective on how Vitamin D influences human health has changed dramatically based on the finding that the Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) and the Vitamin D activating enzyme 1-α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) are expressed in many cell types which are not involved in bone and mineral metabolism, such as intestine, pancreas, prostate and cells of the immune system. This suggests an important impact of Vitamin D on a much wider aspect of human health than previously known. Especially in the field of human immunology, the extra-renal synthesis of the active metabolite calcitriol—1,25(OH)2D— by immune cells and peripheral tissues has been proposed to have immunomodulatory properties similar to locally active cytokines. Vitamin D plays several roles in the body, influencing bone health as well as serum calcium and phosphate levels. Furthermore, Vitamin D may modify immune function, cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis [1,2].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/14086
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