Objective: To evaluate the association between high uric acid (UA), reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in outpatient children and adolescents with overweight (OW) or obesity (OB). Methods: Anthropometric, biochemical, hepatic ultrasound and eGFR data were available from 2565 young people with OW/OB (age 5–18 years). eGFR was calculated using the Schwartz’s bedside formula and reduced eGFR (ReGFR+) was defined by a value < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. High UA was defined as ≥ 75th percentile by sex in children and adolescents. Results: The population was stratified in four categories: (1) normal eGFR and absence of NAFLD (ReGFR−/NAFLD−) (n = 1,236); (2) ReGFR+ and absence of NAFLD (ReGFR+/NAFLD− (n = 155); (3) normal eGFR and presence of NAFLD (ReGFR−/NAFLD+) (n = 1019); (4) presence of both conditions (ReGFR+/NAFLD+) (n = 155). Proportions of youth with high UA across the four categories were 17%, 30%, 33% and 46%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Young people with high levels of UA had odds ratio (95% CI) of 2.11 (1.43–3.11) for ReGFR+; 2.82 (2.26–3.45) for NAFLD+; and 5.04 (3.45–7.39) for both conditions (P < 0.0001 for all), independently of major confounders. Conclusions: High levels of UA were independently associated with ReGFR, NAFLD and the combination of both conditions in young people with OW/OB. The strength of this association was the highest in cases presenting both reduced eGFR and NAFLD. UA may serve as marker to identify patients at risk for these conditions.

High uric acid, reduced glomerular filtration rate and non-alcoholic fatty liver in young people with obesity

Baroni M. G.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the association between high uric acid (UA), reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in outpatient children and adolescents with overweight (OW) or obesity (OB). Methods: Anthropometric, biochemical, hepatic ultrasound and eGFR data were available from 2565 young people with OW/OB (age 5–18 years). eGFR was calculated using the Schwartz’s bedside formula and reduced eGFR (ReGFR+) was defined by a value < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2. High UA was defined as ≥ 75th percentile by sex in children and adolescents. Results: The population was stratified in four categories: (1) normal eGFR and absence of NAFLD (ReGFR−/NAFLD−) (n = 1,236); (2) ReGFR+ and absence of NAFLD (ReGFR+/NAFLD− (n = 155); (3) normal eGFR and presence of NAFLD (ReGFR−/NAFLD+) (n = 1019); (4) presence of both conditions (ReGFR+/NAFLD+) (n = 155). Proportions of youth with high UA across the four categories were 17%, 30%, 33% and 46%, respectively (P < 0.0001). Young people with high levels of UA had odds ratio (95% CI) of 2.11 (1.43–3.11) for ReGFR+; 2.82 (2.26–3.45) for NAFLD+; and 5.04 (3.45–7.39) for both conditions (P < 0.0001 for all), independently of major confounders. Conclusions: High levels of UA were independently associated with ReGFR, NAFLD and the combination of both conditions in young people with OW/OB. The strength of this association was the highest in cases presenting both reduced eGFR and NAFLD. UA may serve as marker to identify patients at risk for these conditions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/144004
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