Extracellular electrophysiological recordings of neurons of the parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus were done in normal rats and in rats bearing lesions of either the cerebellar nuclei or the entopeduncular nucleus to investigate the functional control of the pedunculopontine nucleus on the parafascicular nucleus. A total of 97 neurons were recorded in the parafascicular nucleus in intact rats, 83 in rats bearing a chronic electrolytic lesion of the ipsilateral deep cerebellar nuclei, and 69 in rats bearing an ibotenate lesion of the ipsilateral entopeduncular nucleus. Lesions of the cerebellar nuclei or the entopeduncular nucleus were made to evaluate the participation of cerebellothalamic fibers or of polysynaptic basal ganglia circuits in the responses recorded in parafascicular neurons following electrical microstimulation of the ipsilateral pedunculopontine nucleus. Two types of excitation and one type of inhibition were the main responses observed in neurons of the parafascicular nucleus following stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus. The first type of excitation, observed in 49.5% of neurons recorded in normal rats, had an onset of 1.8 +/- 0.6 ms, lasted 9.2 +/- 0.8 ms and was able to follow high frequency stimulation over 300 Hz. The second type of excitation, observed in a smaller percentage of neurons recorded (3.1%), was a long-latency (8.3 +/- 0.7 ms) activation lasting 19.0 +/- 4.5 ms. It did not follow stimulation frequencies higher than 50-100 Hz. The inhibitory response was observed in 17.5% of the neurons recorded. The latency of this inhibition was 4.5 +/- 1.8 ms and the duration 41.9 +/- 6.8 ms. In rats bearing a lesion of the deep cerebellar nuclei or of the entopeduncular nucleus, the short-latency activation was still present in 24.1% and 31.9% of neurons recorded, respectively. However, the occurrence of the long-latency excitation rats bearing lesions of either the cerebellum or the entopeduncular nucleus increased to 12.1% and to 17.4%, respectively, while the occurrence of the inhibition rose to 22.9% and to 28.9%. These results show that an excitatory influence on the parafascicular nucleus is exerted by the pedunculopontine nucleus irrespectively of the presence of cerebellofugal fibers. This influence appears to be also independent from the integrity of basal ganglia circuits having a relay at the level of the entopeduncular nucleus. However, the variety of responses recorded suggests that the influences of the pedunculopontine nucleus on the parafascicular nucleus are by far more complex than those exerted on its basal ganglia targets such as the substantia nigra. The results are discussed according to a model of functioning of pedunculopontine fibers directed to thalamic and basal ganglia nuclei

The pedunculopontine nucleus projection to the parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus: an electrophysiological investigation in the rat

CAPOZZO, ANNAMARIA;FLORIO, TIZIANA MARILENA;MORICONI, ULISSANDRA;SCARNATI, Eugenio
2003

Abstract

Extracellular electrophysiological recordings of neurons of the parafascicular nucleus of the thalamus were done in normal rats and in rats bearing lesions of either the cerebellar nuclei or the entopeduncular nucleus to investigate the functional control of the pedunculopontine nucleus on the parafascicular nucleus. A total of 97 neurons were recorded in the parafascicular nucleus in intact rats, 83 in rats bearing a chronic electrolytic lesion of the ipsilateral deep cerebellar nuclei, and 69 in rats bearing an ibotenate lesion of the ipsilateral entopeduncular nucleus. Lesions of the cerebellar nuclei or the entopeduncular nucleus were made to evaluate the participation of cerebellothalamic fibers or of polysynaptic basal ganglia circuits in the responses recorded in parafascicular neurons following electrical microstimulation of the ipsilateral pedunculopontine nucleus. Two types of excitation and one type of inhibition were the main responses observed in neurons of the parafascicular nucleus following stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus. The first type of excitation, observed in 49.5% of neurons recorded in normal rats, had an onset of 1.8 +/- 0.6 ms, lasted 9.2 +/- 0.8 ms and was able to follow high frequency stimulation over 300 Hz. The second type of excitation, observed in a smaller percentage of neurons recorded (3.1%), was a long-latency (8.3 +/- 0.7 ms) activation lasting 19.0 +/- 4.5 ms. It did not follow stimulation frequencies higher than 50-100 Hz. The inhibitory response was observed in 17.5% of the neurons recorded. The latency of this inhibition was 4.5 +/- 1.8 ms and the duration 41.9 +/- 6.8 ms. In rats bearing a lesion of the deep cerebellar nuclei or of the entopeduncular nucleus, the short-latency activation was still present in 24.1% and 31.9% of neurons recorded, respectively. However, the occurrence of the long-latency excitation rats bearing lesions of either the cerebellum or the entopeduncular nucleus increased to 12.1% and to 17.4%, respectively, while the occurrence of the inhibition rose to 22.9% and to 28.9%. These results show that an excitatory influence on the parafascicular nucleus is exerted by the pedunculopontine nucleus irrespectively of the presence of cerebellofugal fibers. This influence appears to be also independent from the integrity of basal ganglia circuits having a relay at the level of the entopeduncular nucleus. However, the variety of responses recorded suggests that the influences of the pedunculopontine nucleus on the parafascicular nucleus are by far more complex than those exerted on its basal ganglia targets such as the substantia nigra. The results are discussed according to a model of functioning of pedunculopontine fibers directed to thalamic and basal ganglia nuclei
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/14618
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