Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have received attention as an ideal source of regenerative cells because of their multipotent differentiation potential. Adipose tissue is an attractive source of MSCs. Recent studies have shown that autologous fat grafting may be effective in the treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc), but no specific study exists that aimed at investigating whether adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) from SSc patients maintain normal phenotypic and functional characteristics. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether ADSCs from patients with SSc (SSc-ADSCs) are phenotypically and functionally identical to those from healthy controls (HC-ADSCs). Adipose tissue samples were obtained from 10 patients with SSc and from 8 HCs. Both MSC populations were evaluated for their capacity to (a) express specific MSC surface antigens by flow cytometry analysis, (b) proliferate, (c) differentiate along the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages, (d) suppress in vitro lymphocyte proliferation induced by a mitogenic stimulus, and (e) support endothelial cell (EC) tube formation. ADSCs from SSc patients and HCs showed similar surface phenotype and multilineage differentiation capabilities. In PBMC proliferation inhibition assays, no significant differences were observed between SSc- and HC-ADSCs. Using ADSC/EC cocultures, both SSc- and HC-ADSCs improved tube formation by both HC- and SSc-ECs. This effect was enhanced under hypoxic conditions in all of the cocultures. SSc-ADSCs exhibited the same phenotypic pattern, proliferation and differentiation potentials, and immunosuppressive properties as those from HCs. The proangiogenic activity shown by SSc-ADSCs, namely, under hypoxic conditions, suggests that autologous ADSC grafting may represent a possible therapeutic option for SSc.

Phenotypical and functional characteristics of in vitro-expanded adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with systematic sclerosis

Cipriani Paola;Di Benedetto Paola;Giacomelli R;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have received attention as an ideal source of regenerative cells because of their multipotent differentiation potential. Adipose tissue is an attractive source of MSCs. Recent studies have shown that autologous fat grafting may be effective in the treatment of systemic sclerosis (SSc), but no specific study exists that aimed at investigating whether adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) from SSc patients maintain normal phenotypic and functional characteristics. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether ADSCs from patients with SSc (SSc-ADSCs) are phenotypically and functionally identical to those from healthy controls (HC-ADSCs). Adipose tissue samples were obtained from 10 patients with SSc and from 8 HCs. Both MSC populations were evaluated for their capacity to (a) express specific MSC surface antigens by flow cytometry analysis, (b) proliferate, (c) differentiate along the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages, (d) suppress in vitro lymphocyte proliferation induced by a mitogenic stimulus, and (e) support endothelial cell (EC) tube formation. ADSCs from SSc patients and HCs showed similar surface phenotype and multilineage differentiation capabilities. In PBMC proliferation inhibition assays, no significant differences were observed between SSc- and HC-ADSCs. Using ADSC/EC cocultures, both SSc- and HC-ADSCs improved tube formation by both HC- and SSc-ECs. This effect was enhanced under hypoxic conditions in all of the cocultures. SSc-ADSCs exhibited the same phenotypic pattern, proliferation and differentiation potentials, and immunosuppressive properties as those from HCs. The proangiogenic activity shown by SSc-ADSCs, namely, under hypoxic conditions, suggests that autologous ADSC grafting may represent a possible therapeutic option for SSc.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/146921
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