Biodiversity hotspots are routinely identified by grid-based analyses, despite grids encompassing different habitats, thus hindering the potential to assess which habitat type accounts for the conservation priority assigned to a grid. In this study, we aimed at identifying the main hotspots for the conservation of the European stygobitic Crustacea Copepoda Harpacticoida at the groundwater habitat scale. A multi-metric approach was used, based on six biodiversity indicators: species richness, endemicity, evolutionary origin, phylogenetic rarity, taxonomic distinctness, habitat specificity. The Hot Spot Analysis, based on the statistics Getis-Ord Gi*, was used to compare the local to the global average values of each indicator to identify hotspots of conservation. The operational units used to perform the analyses were the groundwater habitat types, in order to gather all the possible patterns of spatial occupancy in terms of habitat variability. Eight biodiversity hotspots of stygobitic Crustacea Harpacticoida were highlighted: 1) the Pyrenees (Spain and France), 2) the Jura Massif (France), 3) the Alpine arc (France, Switzerland and Italy) embracing southward the River Po alluvial plain and the Slovenian External Dinarides, 4) the Central Apennines (Italy), 5) the Carpathian and Balkan mountains in Romania and at the boundary between western Bulgaria and north-west Macedonia, 6) the Dinaric Alps (from Croatia to Albania), 7) the Sardinia Island, 8) an area in central-northern Europe embracing Denmark, the Netherlands and Germany. The hotspots showed a clear spatial distribution in southern Europe where they were distributed predominantly south to the 45th parallel, in line to what reiteratively observed in previous studies. Many hotspots embraced more than one habitat type. The adoption of discrete groundwater habitat types as working spatial units rather than grids provided a higher resolution of where the stygobitic harpacticoid species effectively live, with the possibility of intervening more precisely to preserve them and their habitats.

Jumping into the grids: mapping biodiversity hotspots in groundwater habitat types across Europe

Iannella M.;Fiasca B.;Biondi M.;Galassi D. M. P.
2020

Abstract

Biodiversity hotspots are routinely identified by grid-based analyses, despite grids encompassing different habitats, thus hindering the potential to assess which habitat type accounts for the conservation priority assigned to a grid. In this study, we aimed at identifying the main hotspots for the conservation of the European stygobitic Crustacea Copepoda Harpacticoida at the groundwater habitat scale. A multi-metric approach was used, based on six biodiversity indicators: species richness, endemicity, evolutionary origin, phylogenetic rarity, taxonomic distinctness, habitat specificity. The Hot Spot Analysis, based on the statistics Getis-Ord Gi*, was used to compare the local to the global average values of each indicator to identify hotspots of conservation. The operational units used to perform the analyses were the groundwater habitat types, in order to gather all the possible patterns of spatial occupancy in terms of habitat variability. Eight biodiversity hotspots of stygobitic Crustacea Harpacticoida were highlighted: 1) the Pyrenees (Spain and France), 2) the Jura Massif (France), 3) the Alpine arc (France, Switzerland and Italy) embracing southward the River Po alluvial plain and the Slovenian External Dinarides, 4) the Central Apennines (Italy), 5) the Carpathian and Balkan mountains in Romania and at the boundary between western Bulgaria and north-west Macedonia, 6) the Dinaric Alps (from Croatia to Albania), 7) the Sardinia Island, 8) an area in central-northern Europe embracing Denmark, the Netherlands and Germany. The hotspots showed a clear spatial distribution in southern Europe where they were distributed predominantly south to the 45th parallel, in line to what reiteratively observed in previous studies. Many hotspots embraced more than one habitat type. The adoption of discrete groundwater habitat types as working spatial units rather than grids provided a higher resolution of where the stygobitic harpacticoid species effectively live, with the possibility of intervening more precisely to preserve them and their habitats.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/148911
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