The aim of the study was to verify whether neuromuscular magnetic stimulation (NMMS) improves muscle function in spinal-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Twenty-two ALS patients were randomized in two groups to receive, daily for two weeks, NMMS in right or left arm (referred to as real-NMMS, rNMMS), and sham NMMS (sNMMS) in the opposite arm. All the patients underwent a median nerve conduction (compound muscle action potential, CMAP) study and a clinical examination that included a handgrip strength test and an evaluation of upper limb muscle strength by means of the Medical Research Council Muscle Scale (MRC). Muscle biopsy was then performed bilaterally on the flexor carpi radialis muscle to monitor morpho-functional parameters and molecular changes. Patients and physicians who performed examinations were blinded to the side of real intervention. The primary outcome was the change in the muscle strength in upper arms. The secondary outcomes were the change from baseline in the CMAP amplitudes, in the nicotinic ACh currents, in the expression levels of a selected panel of genes involved in muscle growth and atrophy, and in histomorphometric parameters of ALS muscle fibers. The Repeated Measures (RM) ANOVA with a Greenhouse-Geisser correction (sphericity not assumed) showed a significant effect [F(3, 63) = 5.907, p < 0.01] of rNMMS on MRC scale at the flexor carpi radialis muscle, thus demonstrating that the rNMMS significantly improves muscle strength in flexor muscles in the forearm. Secondary outcomes showed that the improvement observed in rNMMS-treated muscles was associated to counteracting muscle atrophy, down-modulating the proteolysis, and increasing the efficacy of nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs). We did not observe any significant difference in pre- and post-stimulation CMAP amplitudes, evoked by median nerve stimulation. This suggests that the improvement in muscle strength observed in the stimulated arm is unlikely related to reinnervation. The real and sham treatments were well tolerated without evident side effects. Although promising, this is a proof of concept study, without an immediate clinical translation, that requires further clinical validation.

Neuromuscular magnetic stimulation counteracts muscle decline in ALS patients: results of a randomized, double-blind, controlled study

Cifelli P.;
2019

Abstract

The aim of the study was to verify whether neuromuscular magnetic stimulation (NMMS) improves muscle function in spinal-onset amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. Twenty-two ALS patients were randomized in two groups to receive, daily for two weeks, NMMS in right or left arm (referred to as real-NMMS, rNMMS), and sham NMMS (sNMMS) in the opposite arm. All the patients underwent a median nerve conduction (compound muscle action potential, CMAP) study and a clinical examination that included a handgrip strength test and an evaluation of upper limb muscle strength by means of the Medical Research Council Muscle Scale (MRC). Muscle biopsy was then performed bilaterally on the flexor carpi radialis muscle to monitor morpho-functional parameters and molecular changes. Patients and physicians who performed examinations were blinded to the side of real intervention. The primary outcome was the change in the muscle strength in upper arms. The secondary outcomes were the change from baseline in the CMAP amplitudes, in the nicotinic ACh currents, in the expression levels of a selected panel of genes involved in muscle growth and atrophy, and in histomorphometric parameters of ALS muscle fibers. The Repeated Measures (RM) ANOVA with a Greenhouse-Geisser correction (sphericity not assumed) showed a significant effect [F(3, 63) = 5.907, p < 0.01] of rNMMS on MRC scale at the flexor carpi radialis muscle, thus demonstrating that the rNMMS significantly improves muscle strength in flexor muscles in the forearm. Secondary outcomes showed that the improvement observed in rNMMS-treated muscles was associated to counteracting muscle atrophy, down-modulating the proteolysis, and increasing the efficacy of nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs). We did not observe any significant difference in pre- and post-stimulation CMAP amplitudes, evoked by median nerve stimulation. This suggests that the improvement in muscle strength observed in the stimulated arm is unlikely related to reinnervation. The real and sham treatments were well tolerated without evident side effects. Although promising, this is a proof of concept study, without an immediate clinical translation, that requires further clinical validation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/149872
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