The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) trial demonstrated the efficacy and safety of targeting a systolic blood pressure of <120 mmHg compared to <140 mmHg in selected hypertensive patients. Some evidence, however, suggests a J-curve for; diastolic blood pressure (DBP) particularly in subjects with cardiovascular (CV) and chronic kidney disease. We evaluated the risk of events in SPRINT with focus on these subgroups according to DBP. Mean DBP (±standard deviation) throughout follow-up time was calculated for each patient. Patients were then categorized into five groups according to mean DBP (<60 mmHg, 60–69 mmHg, 70–79 mmHg [reference], 80–89 mmHg, ≥90 mmHg); hazard ratio for outcomes was assessed overall and in the predefined subgroups. A higher risk for CV events was observed in the lower DBP range overall (hazard ratio 1.46, confidential interval 95% 1.1–1.95, P <.001), but not in the absence of pre-existing CV or renal disease. Indeed, such risk significantly increased above 80 mmHg in patients with CV disease and below 70 mmHg in those with chronic kidney disease for selected outcomes. DBP<70 mmHg particularly affected renal outcomes irrespective of renal status. Different risk profiles according to DBP appear to be related to specific clinical characteristics in SPRINT. These findings require further testing in dedicated trials with appropriate follow-up.

Diastolic blood pressure and risk profile in renal and cardiovascular diseases. Results from the SPRINT trial

Del Pinto R.;Pietropaoli D.;Ferri C.
2018

Abstract

The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) trial demonstrated the efficacy and safety of targeting a systolic blood pressure of <120 mmHg compared to <140 mmHg in selected hypertensive patients. Some evidence, however, suggests a J-curve for; diastolic blood pressure (DBP) particularly in subjects with cardiovascular (CV) and chronic kidney disease. We evaluated the risk of events in SPRINT with focus on these subgroups according to DBP. Mean DBP (±standard deviation) throughout follow-up time was calculated for each patient. Patients were then categorized into five groups according to mean DBP (<60 mmHg, 60–69 mmHg, 70–79 mmHg [reference], 80–89 mmHg, ≥90 mmHg); hazard ratio for outcomes was assessed overall and in the predefined subgroups. A higher risk for CV events was observed in the lower DBP range overall (hazard ratio 1.46, confidential interval 95% 1.1–1.95, P <.001), but not in the absence of pre-existing CV or renal disease. Indeed, such risk significantly increased above 80 mmHg in patients with CV disease and below 70 mmHg in those with chronic kidney disease for selected outcomes. DBP<70 mmHg particularly affected renal outcomes irrespective of renal status. Different risk profiles according to DBP appear to be related to specific clinical characteristics in SPRINT. These findings require further testing in dedicated trials with appropriate follow-up.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/154636
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