Background: One of the peculiar aspects of the transplant patient's life is that, in the post-surgery phase, the patient lives in an “isolation” condition, having to pay particular attention to the living environment and preferring a limited social life given that the immunosuppressive treatment entails immunodepression in the patient. With coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID)-19, as in a post-surgery situation, social isolation is being implemented. Materials and Methods: The study started on March 17, 2020, and ended on April 24, 2020. Consulting/phone interviews were made. The phone questionnaire, submitted to 71 patients, consisted of a set of 15 questions that investigated structure and psychological resistance. Eight patients have been monitored exclusively for the psychological aspect through a more articulate supporting path. Results: In essence, from the overall analysis of the data derived from the study of the positioning of patients based on the stage of renal function, the bands related to the development of psychopathological aspects, and the use of positive personal resources, it emerges that patients in stage V kidney failure are in the first bracket as regards the development of psychopathological aspects (absence of these experiences) and in the third bracket as regards the good use of positive resources to deal with isolation. Therefore, it can be deduced that, although with data that can be expanded, a serious or medium-serious situation from an organic point of view in this socio-health emergency situation is well addressed by the transplanted patient. Conclusion: Transplant patients have faced the measure of social distancing adequately and in adherence to the treatment thanks to the phone assistance of all the medical-surgical and psychological team.

Transplant Patients’ Isolation and Social Distancing Because of COVID-19: Analysis of the Resilient Capacities of the Transplant in the Management of the Coronavirus Emergency

Lupi D.;Lancione L.;Chiappori D.;Pisani F.
2020

Abstract

Background: One of the peculiar aspects of the transplant patient's life is that, in the post-surgery phase, the patient lives in an “isolation” condition, having to pay particular attention to the living environment and preferring a limited social life given that the immunosuppressive treatment entails immunodepression in the patient. With coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID)-19, as in a post-surgery situation, social isolation is being implemented. Materials and Methods: The study started on March 17, 2020, and ended on April 24, 2020. Consulting/phone interviews were made. The phone questionnaire, submitted to 71 patients, consisted of a set of 15 questions that investigated structure and psychological resistance. Eight patients have been monitored exclusively for the psychological aspect through a more articulate supporting path. Results: In essence, from the overall analysis of the data derived from the study of the positioning of patients based on the stage of renal function, the bands related to the development of psychopathological aspects, and the use of positive personal resources, it emerges that patients in stage V kidney failure are in the first bracket as regards the development of psychopathological aspects (absence of these experiences) and in the third bracket as regards the good use of positive resources to deal with isolation. Therefore, it can be deduced that, although with data that can be expanded, a serious or medium-serious situation from an organic point of view in this socio-health emergency situation is well addressed by the transplanted patient. Conclusion: Transplant patients have faced the measure of social distancing adequately and in adherence to the treatment thanks to the phone assistance of all the medical-surgical and psychological team.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/155206
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