Objective: To evaluate the link among thyroid function, glucose/insulin metabolism and steroid hormones in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and to verify if the body mass index (BMI) might influence the interplay between PCOS features and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). Study design: Case-control study conducted from January to December 2014. Methods: One-hundred fifty-flour young women with PCOS, according to Rotterdam criteria, and 88 controls were enrolled in an academic research environment. Anthropometric evaluation, hormonal and lipid assays, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp were performed. Hirsutism was assessed with the Ferriman-Gallwey (FG) score. Main results: SCH was found in 14% of PCOS subjects and in 1% of controls (P < 0.01). In PCOS women, TSH levels were directly correlated with fasting glycaemia, but not with other hormonal and metabolic parameters. When PCOS patients were classified on the basis of BMI, TSH levels significantly correlated with insulin secretion, insulin resistance, DHEAS and cortisol levels in obese PCOS women. Inverse correlations were found between TSH and both oestradiol and SHBG in the same group. In nonobese PCOS patients, only waist-to-hip ratio values were correlated with TSH. The prevalence of SCH was not different between nonobese and obese PCOS groups (14 and 15% respectively). However, SCH was associated with higher levels of insulin, DHEAS, cortisol and FG score only in the obese subgroup. Conclusions: Our data confirm that the prevalence of SCH is increased in PCOS women. The presence of SCH is associated with endocrine and metabolic imbalances of PCOS, and the excessive body weight seems to promote this interplay.

The link between metabolic features and TSH levels in polycystic ovary syndrome is modulated by the body weight: An euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp study

Guido M.;
2016

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the link among thyroid function, glucose/insulin metabolism and steroid hormones in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and to verify if the body mass index (BMI) might influence the interplay between PCOS features and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH). Study design: Case-control study conducted from January to December 2014. Methods: One-hundred fifty-flour young women with PCOS, according to Rotterdam criteria, and 88 controls were enrolled in an academic research environment. Anthropometric evaluation, hormonal and lipid assays, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp were performed. Hirsutism was assessed with the Ferriman-Gallwey (FG) score. Main results: SCH was found in 14% of PCOS subjects and in 1% of controls (P < 0.01). In PCOS women, TSH levels were directly correlated with fasting glycaemia, but not with other hormonal and metabolic parameters. When PCOS patients were classified on the basis of BMI, TSH levels significantly correlated with insulin secretion, insulin resistance, DHEAS and cortisol levels in obese PCOS women. Inverse correlations were found between TSH and both oestradiol and SHBG in the same group. In nonobese PCOS patients, only waist-to-hip ratio values were correlated with TSH. The prevalence of SCH was not different between nonobese and obese PCOS groups (14 and 15% respectively). However, SCH was associated with higher levels of insulin, DHEAS, cortisol and FG score only in the obese subgroup. Conclusions: Our data confirm that the prevalence of SCH is increased in PCOS women. The presence of SCH is associated with endocrine and metabolic imbalances of PCOS, and the excessive body weight seems to promote this interplay.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/156172
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