To investigate the associations of endogenous testosterone with prostate growing disorders (PGD) including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCA).

Objective: To investigate the associations of endogenous testosterone with prostate growing disorders (PGD) including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCA). Methods: The study population was composed by 1176 cases including 371 BPH subjects (31.5%) without cancer who underwent prostate transurethral resection from January 2017 to November 2019 and 805 patients (68.5%) with PCA who underwent surgery from November 2014 to December 2019. The association of endogenous testosterone, which was measured before surgery, with the risk of PGD was evaluated by statistical methods. Results: In the study population, endogenous testosterone levels were significantly lower in PCA cases compared to BPH patients who were older with larger prostates but lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. On multivariate analysis, the risk of PCA decreased by endogenous testosterone (odds ratio, OR = 0.957; 95% CI 0.930–0.984; p = 0.002) as by age (OR = 0.955; 95% CI 0.933–0.984; p < 0,0001) and prostate volume (OR = 0.930; 95% CI 0.919–0.940; p < 0.0001) but increased by PSA (OR = 1.652; 95% CI 1.542–1.769; p < 0.0001). On multivariate linear regression analysis, endogenous testosterone inversely associated with body mass index (BMI) (regression coefficient, b = – 0.279; p = 0.002) and PCA (b = – 2.935; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In the aging male, endogenous testosterone independently predicted malignant prostate disorders, which associated with decreased hormone levels along BMI categories. Endogenous testosterone is a further marker for evaluating prostate growing disorders in clinical practice; however, controlled studies are required.

Endogenous testosterone as a predictor of prostate growing disorders in the aging male

Siracusano S.;
2021

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the associations of endogenous testosterone with prostate growing disorders (PGD) including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCA). Methods: The study population was composed by 1176 cases including 371 BPH subjects (31.5%) without cancer who underwent prostate transurethral resection from January 2017 to November 2019 and 805 patients (68.5%) with PCA who underwent surgery from November 2014 to December 2019. The association of endogenous testosterone, which was measured before surgery, with the risk of PGD was evaluated by statistical methods. Results: In the study population, endogenous testosterone levels were significantly lower in PCA cases compared to BPH patients who were older with larger prostates but lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. On multivariate analysis, the risk of PCA decreased by endogenous testosterone (odds ratio, OR = 0.957; 95% CI 0.930–0.984; p = 0.002) as by age (OR = 0.955; 95% CI 0.933–0.984; p < 0,0001) and prostate volume (OR = 0.930; 95% CI 0.919–0.940; p < 0.0001) but increased by PSA (OR = 1.652; 95% CI 1.542–1.769; p < 0.0001). On multivariate linear regression analysis, endogenous testosterone inversely associated with body mass index (BMI) (regression coefficient, b = – 0.279; p = 0.002) and PCA (b = – 2.935; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: In the aging male, endogenous testosterone independently predicted malignant prostate disorders, which associated with decreased hormone levels along BMI categories. Endogenous testosterone is a further marker for evaluating prostate growing disorders in clinical practice; however, controlled studies are required.
To investigate the associations of endogenous testosterone with prostate growing disorders (PGD) including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCA).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/156720
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