Background. After primary maternal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during pregnancy, infants are at risk for disease. Methods. Factors predictive of infant outcome were analyzed in a database of 304 pregnant women with primary infection. These women were enrolled between 2010 and 2017 and delivered 281 infants, of whom 108 were CMV infected. Long term follow-up occurred for 173 uninfected and 106 infected infants at age 4 years (range, 1-8 years). One hundred fifty-seven women were treated with an average of 2 doses (range, 1-6 doses) of high-dose hyperimmune globulin (HIG: 200 mg/kg/infusion). We used a regression model to define predictors of fetal infection, symptoms at birth, and long-term sequelae; 31 covariates were tested. Results. Four factors predicted fetal infection: a 1.8-fold increase (30% vs 56%) in the rate of congenital infection without HIG (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 5.2; P < .0001), a 1.8-fold increase (32% vs 56%) associated with maternal viral DNAemia prior to HIG administration (AOR, 3.0; P = .002), abnormal ultrasounds (AOR, 59; P = .0002), and diagnosis of maternal infection by seroconversion rather than avidity (AOR, 3.3; P = .007). Lack of HIG and abnormal ultrasounds also predicted symptoms (P = .001). Long-term sequelae were predicted by not receiving HIG (AOR, 13.2; P = .001), maternal infection in early gestation (odds ratio [OR], 0.9; P = .017), and abnormal ultrasounds (OR, 7.6; P < .003). Prevalence and copy/number of DNAemia declined after HIG. Conclusions. Maternal viremia predicts fetal infection and neonatal outcome. This may help patient counseling. High-dose HIG may prevent fetal infection and disease and is associated with the resolution of DNAemia.

High-dose cytomegalovirus (CMV) Hyperimmune globulin and maternal CMV DNAemia independently predict infant outcome in pregnant women with a primary CMV infection

Carta G.;D'Alfonso A.;Patacchiola F.;
2020

Abstract

Background. After primary maternal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during pregnancy, infants are at risk for disease. Methods. Factors predictive of infant outcome were analyzed in a database of 304 pregnant women with primary infection. These women were enrolled between 2010 and 2017 and delivered 281 infants, of whom 108 were CMV infected. Long term follow-up occurred for 173 uninfected and 106 infected infants at age 4 years (range, 1-8 years). One hundred fifty-seven women were treated with an average of 2 doses (range, 1-6 doses) of high-dose hyperimmune globulin (HIG: 200 mg/kg/infusion). We used a regression model to define predictors of fetal infection, symptoms at birth, and long-term sequelae; 31 covariates were tested. Results. Four factors predicted fetal infection: a 1.8-fold increase (30% vs 56%) in the rate of congenital infection without HIG (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 5.2; P < .0001), a 1.8-fold increase (32% vs 56%) associated with maternal viral DNAemia prior to HIG administration (AOR, 3.0; P = .002), abnormal ultrasounds (AOR, 59; P = .0002), and diagnosis of maternal infection by seroconversion rather than avidity (AOR, 3.3; P = .007). Lack of HIG and abnormal ultrasounds also predicted symptoms (P = .001). Long-term sequelae were predicted by not receiving HIG (AOR, 13.2; P = .001), maternal infection in early gestation (odds ratio [OR], 0.9; P = .017), and abnormal ultrasounds (OR, 7.6; P < .003). Prevalence and copy/number of DNAemia declined after HIG. Conclusions. Maternal viremia predicts fetal infection and neonatal outcome. This may help patient counseling. High-dose HIG may prevent fetal infection and disease and is associated with the resolution of DNAemia.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/162670
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