Infertility affects around 8% of couples with a slight change in percentage in the last years. Despite the significant efforts made in Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in handling this disorder, oocyte quality remains a crucial factor for a positive outcome. A better understanding of the dynamics underlying oocyte maturation, fertilization, and embryo development remains one of the main areas for progress in the ARTs field. Mitochondria are believed to play an essential role in these processes. Mitochondria have a crucial part in producing energy for oocyte maturation and embryo development throughout precise cellular functions comprising Ca2+ homeostasis regulation, glycolysis, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, and regulation of apoptosis. Recent studies suggest that mitochondrial structure, content, and function may be related to oocyte competence, embryo viability, and implantation success during ARTs. Their defects could lead to low fertilization rates and embryonic development failure. This review aimed to provide an overview of the available literature data surrounding the correlation between changes at ultrastructural level of mitochondria or correlated-mitochondrial aggregates and oocyte quality and ARTs treatments. Our reported data demonstrated that oocyte mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations could be partial or complete recovery during the early embryo stages. However, these changes could persist as quiescent during the pre-implantation embryo development, causing abnormalities that become evident only during fetal and postnatal life. These factors led to consider the mitochondria as a crucial marker of oocyte and embryo quality, as well as a strategic target for further prospective therapeutical approaches.

Ultrastructure of mitochondria of human oocytes in different clinical conditions during assisted reproduction

Belli, Manuel;Palmerini, Maria Grazia;Bianchi, Serena;Bernardi, Sara;Khalili, Mohammad Ali;Macchiarelli, Guido
2021

Abstract

Infertility affects around 8% of couples with a slight change in percentage in the last years. Despite the significant efforts made in Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) in handling this disorder, oocyte quality remains a crucial factor for a positive outcome. A better understanding of the dynamics underlying oocyte maturation, fertilization, and embryo development remains one of the main areas for progress in the ARTs field. Mitochondria are believed to play an essential role in these processes. Mitochondria have a crucial part in producing energy for oocyte maturation and embryo development throughout precise cellular functions comprising Ca2+ homeostasis regulation, glycolysis, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, and regulation of apoptosis. Recent studies suggest that mitochondrial structure, content, and function may be related to oocyte competence, embryo viability, and implantation success during ARTs. Their defects could lead to low fertilization rates and embryonic development failure. This review aimed to provide an overview of the available literature data surrounding the correlation between changes at ultrastructural level of mitochondria or correlated-mitochondrial aggregates and oocyte quality and ARTs treatments. Our reported data demonstrated that oocyte mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations could be partial or complete recovery during the early embryo stages. However, these changes could persist as quiescent during the pre-implantation embryo development, causing abnormalities that become evident only during fetal and postnatal life. These factors led to consider the mitochondria as a crucial marker of oocyte and embryo quality, as well as a strategic target for further prospective therapeutical approaches.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Belli et al., 2021. ABB.pdf

non disponibili

Tipologia: Documento in Versione Editoriale
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 4.07 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
4.07 MB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/164090
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 6
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact