Active immunization in pregnancy is recommended for the influenza and the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines. Evidence indicates vaccine effectiveness in preventing influenza-related hospitalizations and pertussis in early infancy. We investigate vaccine uptake in pregnant and non-pregnant women through a sample of young women and consultant gynecologists, along with the potential predisposing and/or enabling factors affecting attitudes to vaccination (knowledge, beliefs, barriers). A cross-sectional study was conducted between June and September 2019, with a sample of 251 women and 14 consultant gynecologists at the Local Health Authority (ASL01) of the Abruzzo Region (Italy), using an anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey. Among the participants, 5.6% of women had received influenza vaccination, 16.4% had received Tdap during pregnancy and only 1.2% had received both vaccines. The assessment of the psychometric attitudinal variables has suggested a more positive willingness to receive Tdap than influenza vaccine among women, as the former is considered more important for the maternal and neonatal health. Health care workers have reported vaccine safety concerns, lack of information, and misconceptions about the need for vaccination as barriers to immunization in pregnant women. The results of this study will contribute to defining the goals and strategies to increase vaccine uptake under the current recommendations, through promoting effective training programs for all health care workers involved (gynecologists, obstetricians, public health physicians).

Experience and attitudes on vaccinations recommended during pregnancy: survey on an Italian sample of women and consultant gynecologists

Scatigna, Maria;Appetiti, Alessandro;D’Eugenio, Silvia;Fabiani, Leila;Giuliani, Anna Rita
2021

Abstract

Active immunization in pregnancy is recommended for the influenza and the tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines. Evidence indicates vaccine effectiveness in preventing influenza-related hospitalizations and pertussis in early infancy. We investigate vaccine uptake in pregnant and non-pregnant women through a sample of young women and consultant gynecologists, along with the potential predisposing and/or enabling factors affecting attitudes to vaccination (knowledge, beliefs, barriers). A cross-sectional study was conducted between June and September 2019, with a sample of 251 women and 14 consultant gynecologists at the Local Health Authority (ASL01) of the Abruzzo Region (Italy), using an anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey. Among the participants, 5.6% of women had received influenza vaccination, 16.4% had received Tdap during pregnancy and only 1.2% had received both vaccines. The assessment of the psychometric attitudinal variables has suggested a more positive willingness to receive Tdap than influenza vaccine among women, as the former is considered more important for the maternal and neonatal health. Health care workers have reported vaccine safety concerns, lack of information, and misconceptions about the need for vaccination as barriers to immunization in pregnant women. The results of this study will contribute to defining the goals and strategies to increase vaccine uptake under the current recommendations, through promoting effective training programs for all health care workers involved (gynecologists, obstetricians, public health physicians).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/165719
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