The aim was to examine social, university, health-related differences among heterosexual and Sexual Minority Medical students (SM-Meds), and explore predictors of help-seeking behavior (i.e., current psychological support and hypothetical university counseling use). A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in Italy (2018). Questionnaires included socio-demographic items and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Chi-squared tests and multivariable regressions adjusted for BDI-II score were performed (sample size = 2513). SM-Meds were 13.9%. SM-Meds with depressive symptoms were 40.5%. Both considering overall and non-depressed students, SM-Meds exercised less and had worst relationships with family and classmates. Psychological support was reported by 6.1% (SM-Meds: 12.8%) and hypothetical counseling use by 42.7% (SM-Meds: 47.1%). Multivariable models showed SM-Meds had significant higher likelihood of psychological support. Therefore, SM-Meds reported higher help-seeking behavior, lower physical activity and social support. Universities should promote more inclusive learning climate and activities to increase exercise, especially among SM-Meds.

Mental health of medical students belonging to sexual minorities: A focus on help-seeking behavior in an Italian multicenter survey

Brunelli L.;Cofini V.;D'Onofrio S.;D'Errico M.;
2021

Abstract

The aim was to examine social, university, health-related differences among heterosexual and Sexual Minority Medical students (SM-Meds), and explore predictors of help-seeking behavior (i.e., current psychological support and hypothetical university counseling use). A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted in Italy (2018). Questionnaires included socio-demographic items and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Chi-squared tests and multivariable regressions adjusted for BDI-II score were performed (sample size = 2513). SM-Meds were 13.9%. SM-Meds with depressive symptoms were 40.5%. Both considering overall and non-depressed students, SM-Meds exercised less and had worst relationships with family and classmates. Psychological support was reported by 6.1% (SM-Meds: 12.8%) and hypothetical counseling use by 42.7% (SM-Meds: 47.1%). Multivariable models showed SM-Meds had significant higher likelihood of psychological support. Therefore, SM-Meds reported higher help-seeking behavior, lower physical activity and social support. Universities should promote more inclusive learning climate and activities to increase exercise, especially among SM-Meds.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/167071
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