Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the single-point insulin sensitivity estimator (SPISE) index, an insulin sensitivity indicator validated in adolescents and adults, and metabolic profile in overweight/obese children, and to evaluate whether basal SPISE is predictive of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) development later in life. Methods: The SPISE index (= 600 × HDL0.185/Triglycerides0.2 × BMI1.338) was calculated in 909 overweight/obese children undergoing metabolic evaluations at University of Cagliari, Italy, and in 99 normal-weight, age-, sex-comparable children, selected as a reference group, together with other insulin-derived indicators of insulin sensitivity/resistance. 200 overweight/obese children were followed-up for 6.5 [3.5–10] years, data were used for longitudinal retrospective investigations. Results: At baseline, 96/909 (11%) overweight/obese children had IGR; in this subgroup, SPISE was significantly lower than in normo-glycaemic youths (6.3 ± 1.7 vs. 7 ± 1.6, p < 0.001). The SPISE index correlated positively with the insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and the disposition index (DI), negatively with age, blood pressure, HOMA-IR, basal and 120 min blood glucose and insulin (all p values < 0.001). A correlation between SPISE, HOMA-IR and ISI was also reported in normal-weight children. At the 6.5-year follow-up, lower basal SPISE—but not ISI or HOMA-IR—was an independent predictor of IGR development (OR = 3.89(1.65–9.13), p = 0.002; AUROC: 0.82(0.72–0.92), p < 0.001). Conclusion: In children, low SPISE index is significantly associated with metabolic abnormalities and predicts the development of IGR in life.

The single-point insulin sensitivity estimator (SPISE) index is a strong predictor of abnormal glucose metabolism in overweight/obese children: a long-term follow-up study

Bailetti D.
Investigation
;
Barbonetti A.;Baroni M. G.
2021

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the single-point insulin sensitivity estimator (SPISE) index, an insulin sensitivity indicator validated in adolescents and adults, and metabolic profile in overweight/obese children, and to evaluate whether basal SPISE is predictive of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) development later in life. Methods: The SPISE index (= 600 × HDL0.185/Triglycerides0.2 × BMI1.338) was calculated in 909 overweight/obese children undergoing metabolic evaluations at University of Cagliari, Italy, and in 99 normal-weight, age-, sex-comparable children, selected as a reference group, together with other insulin-derived indicators of insulin sensitivity/resistance. 200 overweight/obese children were followed-up for 6.5 [3.5–10] years, data were used for longitudinal retrospective investigations. Results: At baseline, 96/909 (11%) overweight/obese children had IGR; in this subgroup, SPISE was significantly lower than in normo-glycaemic youths (6.3 ± 1.7 vs. 7 ± 1.6, p < 0.001). The SPISE index correlated positively with the insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and the disposition index (DI), negatively with age, blood pressure, HOMA-IR, basal and 120 min blood glucose and insulin (all p values < 0.001). A correlation between SPISE, HOMA-IR and ISI was also reported in normal-weight children. At the 6.5-year follow-up, lower basal SPISE—but not ISI or HOMA-IR—was an independent predictor of IGR development (OR = 3.89(1.65–9.13), p = 0.002; AUROC: 0.82(0.72–0.92), p < 0.001). Conclusion: In children, low SPISE index is significantly associated with metabolic abnormalities and predicts the development of IGR in life.
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Descrizione: The single‑point insulin sensitivity estimator (SPISE) index is a strong predictor of abnormal glucose metabolism in overweight/obese children JEI 2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/171575
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