In this study, we describe the distribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA in the binocular primary visual cortex of the rat during postnatal development, starting at postnatal day (P) 13. High-resolution non-isotopic in situ hybridization combined with Nissl staining were used to quantify the number of cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA. At P13, most of the cells express brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA. after eye opening (P14-P15), the relative number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA-positive cells decreases by a factor of two in layer IV, i.e. that receiving the visual input, and in layer V. To verify the hypothesis that light could trigger this decrease, pups were kept in complete darkness from birth. At P22, pups reared in the dark were killed and the visual cortex processed for in situ hybridization and northern blotting. The results obtained in dark-reared animals prove that light deprivation can: (i) decrease the general levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA, and (ii) increase the relative number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA-positive cells in layers IV and V with respect to control rats. Exposure to light for five days after the period of darkness restored the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA-positive cells. We conclude that the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA in the rat primary visual cortex is regulated during development and that this process is under the control of visual input. (C) 1998 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

Dark rearing blocks the developmental down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA expression in layers IV and V of the rat visual cortex

DOMENICI, LUCIANO
1999-01-01

Abstract

In this study, we describe the distribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA in the binocular primary visual cortex of the rat during postnatal development, starting at postnatal day (P) 13. High-resolution non-isotopic in situ hybridization combined with Nissl staining were used to quantify the number of cells expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA. At P13, most of the cells express brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA. after eye opening (P14-P15), the relative number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA-positive cells decreases by a factor of two in layer IV, i.e. that receiving the visual input, and in layer V. To verify the hypothesis that light could trigger this decrease, pups were kept in complete darkness from birth. At P22, pups reared in the dark were killed and the visual cortex processed for in situ hybridization and northern blotting. The results obtained in dark-reared animals prove that light deprivation can: (i) decrease the general levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA, and (ii) increase the relative number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA-positive cells in layers IV and V with respect to control rats. Exposure to light for five days after the period of darkness restored the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA-positive cells. We conclude that the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA in the rat primary visual cortex is regulated during development and that this process is under the control of visual input. (C) 1998 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/17549
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