Purpose: Salivary gland (SG) tissue and derived neoplasms may occur in the sellar region. As the current literature is mostly limited to case reports, the puzzling case of an inflammatory SG removed by transsphenoidal surgery (TS) and mimicking a prolactinoma prompted us to perform the first systematic review of these unusual conditions. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. Forty-four individual cases—non-neoplastic enlarged salivary glands (NNESG, n = 15), primary benign (n = 7) and malignant (n = 8) ectopic salivary tumours (ST) and sellar metastasis from eutopic primary ST (n = 14)—were suitable for the analysis of clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics. Therapeutic outcome was reviewed as a secondary endpoint. Results: All cases were diagnosed after surgery. NNESG commonly affected young and/or female patients, typically leading to headaches and hyperprolactinemia and originating close to the neurohypophysis. Submucosal SG should be excluded before concluding to an intrasellar NNESG after TS. No gender or age predominance was found for primary ectopic ST, which present as large tumors, with histological phenotypes similar to common ST. Hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus were more frequent in ST than in NNESG. NNESG and benign ectopic ST rarely recur. Malignant ectopic ST should be distinguished from secondary localizations of eutopic ST reaching the sella by contiguity or metastatic spread; both share a frequent unfavorable outcome. Conclusion: Sellar neoplasms derived from SG are rare but misleading conditions and pituitary dysfunction is likely to be more common than currently reported. Appropriate pathological evaluation and multidisciplinary approach are required.

Salivary gland tissues and derived primary and metastatic neoplasms: unusual pitfalls in the work-up of sellar lesions. A systematic review

Jaffrain-Rea M. -L.
2021

Abstract

Purpose: Salivary gland (SG) tissue and derived neoplasms may occur in the sellar region. As the current literature is mostly limited to case reports, the puzzling case of an inflammatory SG removed by transsphenoidal surgery (TS) and mimicking a prolactinoma prompted us to perform the first systematic review of these unusual conditions. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines. Forty-four individual cases—non-neoplastic enlarged salivary glands (NNESG, n = 15), primary benign (n = 7) and malignant (n = 8) ectopic salivary tumours (ST) and sellar metastasis from eutopic primary ST (n = 14)—were suitable for the analysis of clinical, radiological and pathological characteristics. Therapeutic outcome was reviewed as a secondary endpoint. Results: All cases were diagnosed after surgery. NNESG commonly affected young and/or female patients, typically leading to headaches and hyperprolactinemia and originating close to the neurohypophysis. Submucosal SG should be excluded before concluding to an intrasellar NNESG after TS. No gender or age predominance was found for primary ectopic ST, which present as large tumors, with histological phenotypes similar to common ST. Hypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus were more frequent in ST than in NNESG. NNESG and benign ectopic ST rarely recur. Malignant ectopic ST should be distinguished from secondary localizations of eutopic ST reaching the sella by contiguity or metastatic spread; both share a frequent unfavorable outcome. Conclusion: Sellar neoplasms derived from SG are rare but misleading conditions and pituitary dysfunction is likely to be more common than currently reported. Appropriate pathological evaluation and multidisciplinary approach are required.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/178392
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