The CSES satellite aims to monitor electromagnetic-, particle- and plasma perturbations in the iono- magnetosphere and inner Van Allen radiation belts, originated by electromagnetic sources external and internal to the geomagnetic cavity, cosmic rays and solar events. In particular, the objective of the space mission is to investigate lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms (including effects of lightning, earthquakes, volcanoes and artificial electromagnetic emissions) that induce perturbations of the top side of the ionosphere and lower boundary of the radiation belts. To this purpose, the mission has been conceived to take advantage of a multi-instrument payload comprising nine detectors for the measurement of electromagnetic field components, plasma parameters and energetic particles, as well as X-ray flux. The Italian team participating in the CSES mission has built one of these devices, the High-Energy Particle Detector (HEPD), for high-precision observations of electrons, protons and light nuclei. During its trip along the orbit, and thanks to the large set of detectors operated on board, CSES completely monitors the Earth, acting as an excellent instrument for Space Weather. The satellite was launched on Feb 2, 2018, with an expected lifespan of 5 years. This article describes the CSES mission with a particular focus on the HEPD apparatus and its in-flight performance.

Scientific goals and in-orbit performance of the High Energy Particle Detector on board the CSES satellite

Piersanti M;
2019

Abstract

The CSES satellite aims to monitor electromagnetic-, particle- and plasma perturbations in the iono- magnetosphere and inner Van Allen radiation belts, originated by electromagnetic sources external and internal to the geomagnetic cavity, cosmic rays and solar events. In particular, the objective of the space mission is to investigate lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms (including effects of lightning, earthquakes, volcanoes and artificial electromagnetic emissions) that induce perturbations of the top side of the ionosphere and lower boundary of the radiation belts. To this purpose, the mission has been conceived to take advantage of a multi-instrument payload comprising nine detectors for the measurement of electromagnetic field components, plasma parameters and energetic particles, as well as X-ray flux. The Italian team participating in the CSES mission has built one of these devices, the High-Energy Particle Detector (HEPD), for high-precision observations of electrons, protons and light nuclei. During its trip along the orbit, and thanks to the large set of detectors operated on board, CSES completely monitors the Earth, acting as an excellent instrument for Space Weather. The satellite was launched on Feb 2, 2018, with an expected lifespan of 5 years. This article describes the CSES mission with a particular focus on the HEPD apparatus and its in-flight performance.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/179187
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