There are currently no treatments that can slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). There is, however, a growing body of evidence that activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1-receptor) can not only restore memory loss in AD patients but in preclinical animal models can also slow neurodegenerative disease progression. The generation of an effective medicine targeting the M1-receptor has however been severely hampered by associated cholinergic adverse responses. By using genetically engineered mouse models that express a G protein–biased M1-receptor, we recently established that M1-receptor mediated adverse responses can be minimized by ensuring activating ligands maintain receptor phosphorylation/ arrestin-dependent signaling. Here, we use these same genetic models in concert with murine prion disease, a terminal neurodegenerative disease showing key hallmarks of AD, to establish that phosphorylation/arrestin-dependent signaling delivers neuroprotection that both extends normal animal behavior and prolongs the life span of prion-diseased mice. Our data point to an important neuroprotective property inherent to the M1-receptor and indicate that next generation M1-receptor ligands designed to drive receptor phosphorylation/arrestin-dependent signaling would potentially show low adverse responses while delivering neuroprotection that will slow disease progression.

Biased M1 muscarinic receptor mutant mice show accelerated progression of prion neurodegenerative disease

Rossi M.;
2021

Abstract

There are currently no treatments that can slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). There is, however, a growing body of evidence that activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1-receptor) can not only restore memory loss in AD patients but in preclinical animal models can also slow neurodegenerative disease progression. The generation of an effective medicine targeting the M1-receptor has however been severely hampered by associated cholinergic adverse responses. By using genetically engineered mouse models that express a G protein–biased M1-receptor, we recently established that M1-receptor mediated adverse responses can be minimized by ensuring activating ligands maintain receptor phosphorylation/ arrestin-dependent signaling. Here, we use these same genetic models in concert with murine prion disease, a terminal neurodegenerative disease showing key hallmarks of AD, to establish that phosphorylation/arrestin-dependent signaling delivers neuroprotection that both extends normal animal behavior and prolongs the life span of prion-diseased mice. Our data point to an important neuroprotective property inherent to the M1-receptor and indicate that next generation M1-receptor ligands designed to drive receptor phosphorylation/arrestin-dependent signaling would potentially show low adverse responses while delivering neuroprotection that will slow disease progression.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/181661
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