In catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, the interface between metal nanoparticles (NPs) and the support material is of high importance for the activity and reaction selectivity. In Pt NPcontaining UiO Zr-metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), key intermediates in methanol formation are adsorbed at open Zrsites at the Pt-MOF interface. In this study, we investigate the dynamic role of the Zr-node and the influence of H2O on the CO2 hydrogenation reaction at 170 °C, through steady state and transient isotope exchange experiments, H2O cofeed measurements, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The study revealed that an increased number of Zr-node defects increase the formation rates to both methanol and methane. Transient experiments linked the increase to a higher number of surface intermediates for both products. Experiments involving either dehydrated or prehydrated Zr-nodes showed higher methanol and methane formation rates over the dehydrated Zr-node. Transient experiments suggested that the difference is related to competitive adsorption between methanol and water. DFT calculations and microkinetic modeling support this conclusion and give further insight into the equilibria involved in the competitive adsorption process. The calculations revealed weaker adsorption of methanol in defective or dehydrated nodes, in agreement with the larger gas phase concentration of methanol observed experimentally. The microkinetic model shows that [Zr2(μ-O)2]4+ and [Zr2(μ-OH)(μ-O)(OH)(H2O)]4+ are the main surface species when the concentration of water is lower than the number of defect sites. Lastly, although addition of water was found to promote methanol desorption, water does not change the methanol steady state reaction rate, while it has a substantial inhibiting effect on CH4 formation. These results indicate that water can be used to increase the reaction selectivity to methanol and encourages further detailed investigations of the catalyst system.

Influence of defects and H2O on the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol over pt nanoparticles in UiO-67 metal-organic framework

Lazzarini A.;
2020

Abstract

In catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, the interface between metal nanoparticles (NPs) and the support material is of high importance for the activity and reaction selectivity. In Pt NPcontaining UiO Zr-metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), key intermediates in methanol formation are adsorbed at open Zrsites at the Pt-MOF interface. In this study, we investigate the dynamic role of the Zr-node and the influence of H2O on the CO2 hydrogenation reaction at 170 °C, through steady state and transient isotope exchange experiments, H2O cofeed measurements, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The study revealed that an increased number of Zr-node defects increase the formation rates to both methanol and methane. Transient experiments linked the increase to a higher number of surface intermediates for both products. Experiments involving either dehydrated or prehydrated Zr-nodes showed higher methanol and methane formation rates over the dehydrated Zr-node. Transient experiments suggested that the difference is related to competitive adsorption between methanol and water. DFT calculations and microkinetic modeling support this conclusion and give further insight into the equilibria involved in the competitive adsorption process. The calculations revealed weaker adsorption of methanol in defective or dehydrated nodes, in agreement with the larger gas phase concentration of methanol observed experimentally. The microkinetic model shows that [Zr2(μ-O)2]4+ and [Zr2(μ-OH)(μ-O)(OH)(H2O)]4+ are the main surface species when the concentration of water is lower than the number of defect sites. Lastly, although addition of water was found to promote methanol desorption, water does not change the methanol steady state reaction rate, while it has a substantial inhibiting effect on CH4 formation. These results indicate that water can be used to increase the reaction selectivity to methanol and encourages further detailed investigations of the catalyst system.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/181757
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