Purpose: Falls are common in patients who have had a stroke who return home after neurorehabilitation. Some studies have found that walking speed inversely correlates with the risk of falls. Scope: This study examined whether comparison between comfortable self-selected walking speed and maximum maintainable speed is informative with regard to the risk of falls in patients with stroke. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed with 75 ambulant stroke patients. At discharge, the Barthel Index score and performance at the 10-m and 6-min walking tests were assessed. Number of falls was recorded by telephone interview every two months for one year. Regression analysis was performed to identify factors that were related to the risk of falls. Results: Using forward multiple linear regression, only the ratio between walking speeds on the 6-min and 10-m tests was linked to the number of falls in the year after discharge (R=-0.451, p<. 0.001, OR=0.046). Patients who chose a walking speed for short distances that was not maintainable long term fell more frequently. Conclusions: A discrepancy between short and long-term walking speed can help in identifying subjects in the subacute stage after stroke with an increased risk of suffering a fall. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

Can overestimation of walking ability increase the risk of falls in people in the subacute stage after stroke on their return home?

Morone G.
;
2014

Abstract

Purpose: Falls are common in patients who have had a stroke who return home after neurorehabilitation. Some studies have found that walking speed inversely correlates with the risk of falls. Scope: This study examined whether comparison between comfortable self-selected walking speed and maximum maintainable speed is informative with regard to the risk of falls in patients with stroke. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed with 75 ambulant stroke patients. At discharge, the Barthel Index score and performance at the 10-m and 6-min walking tests were assessed. Number of falls was recorded by telephone interview every two months for one year. Regression analysis was performed to identify factors that were related to the risk of falls. Results: Using forward multiple linear regression, only the ratio between walking speeds on the 6-min and 10-m tests was linked to the number of falls in the year after discharge (R=-0.451, p<. 0.001, OR=0.046). Patients who chose a walking speed for short distances that was not maintainable long term fell more frequently. Conclusions: A discrepancy between short and long-term walking speed can help in identifying subjects in the subacute stage after stroke with an increased risk of suffering a fall. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/181983
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