Substructure decoupling techniques, defined in the frame of Frequency Based Substructuring, allow to identify the dynamic behaviour of a structural subsystem starting from the known dynamics of the coupled system and from information about the remaining components. The problem of joint identification can be approached in the substructuring framework by decoupling jointed substructures from the assembled system. In this case, information about the coupling DoFs of the assembled structure is necessary and this could be a problem if the interface is inaccessible for measurements. Expansion techniques can be used to obtain the dynamics on inaccessible (interface) DoFs starting from accessible (internal) DoFs. A promising technique is the System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) that combines numerical and experimental models of the same component to obtain a hybrid model. This technique has been already used in an iterative coupling–decoupling procedure to identify the linear dynamic behaviour of a joint, with a Virtual Point description of the interface. In this work, a similar identification procedure is applied to the Brake Reus Beam benchmark to identify the linear dynamic behaviour of a three bolted connection at low levels of excitation. The joint is considered as a third independent substructure that accounts for the mass and stiffness properties of the three bolts, thus avoiding singularity in the decoupling process. Instead of using the Virtual Point Transformation, the interface is modelled by performing a modal condensation on remote points allowing deformation of the connecting surfaces between subcomponents. The purpose of the study is to highlight numerical and ill-conditioning problems that may arise in this kind of identification.

Identification of Bolted Joint Properties Through Substructure Decoupling

Brunetti J.;D'Ambrogio W.;
2023

Abstract

Substructure decoupling techniques, defined in the frame of Frequency Based Substructuring, allow to identify the dynamic behaviour of a structural subsystem starting from the known dynamics of the coupled system and from information about the remaining components. The problem of joint identification can be approached in the substructuring framework by decoupling jointed substructures from the assembled system. In this case, information about the coupling DoFs of the assembled structure is necessary and this could be a problem if the interface is inaccessible for measurements. Expansion techniques can be used to obtain the dynamics on inaccessible (interface) DoFs starting from accessible (internal) DoFs. A promising technique is the System Equivalent Model Mixing (SEMM) that combines numerical and experimental models of the same component to obtain a hybrid model. This technique has been already used in an iterative coupling–decoupling procedure to identify the linear dynamic behaviour of a joint, with a Virtual Point description of the interface. In this work, a similar identification procedure is applied to the Brake Reus Beam benchmark to identify the linear dynamic behaviour of a three bolted connection at low levels of excitation. The joint is considered as a third independent substructure that accounts for the mass and stiffness properties of the three bolts, thus avoiding singularity in the decoupling process. Instead of using the Virtual Point Transformation, the interface is modelled by performing a modal condensation on remote points allowing deformation of the connecting surfaces between subcomponents. The purpose of the study is to highlight numerical and ill-conditioning problems that may arise in this kind of identification.
978-3-031-04093-1
978-3-031-04094-8
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/193740
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