Auto transplantation of immature donor teeth can be a strategic therapeutic solution in young patients. It is preferable to choose this approach instead of prosthetic restorations because it offers a unique and definitive solution. Orthodontic space closure is not always deemed desirable, especially in non-extraction cases (53,54). Successful auto transplantations allow alveolar growth through eruption of donor teeth together with the adjacent dentition when skeletal and dental development is not yet completed. Auto transplantation of third molars is less well-recognised and less documented. The available literature shows promising success rates. Immature donor teeth are reportedly associated with better outcomes than mature donor teeth. Aim of this case report was to analyse the short-term outcomes of auto transplantation of immature maxillary third molars to replace the missing mandibular second premolars in a 17-year-old healthy female with oligodontia. The surgical procedure was performed as a single step. Left and right lower second deciduous molars (7.5-8.5), close to exfoliation, were extracted. Donor upper third molars with developing root were extracted as a traumatically as possible and immediately placed into the surgically modified recipient sites. They were stabilized by a sectional wire. One year after surgery, the survival of both transplanted teeth was achieved. They showed periodontal health, normal mobility and continuation of root development during the follow-up period. The upper left third molar responded to all success criteria, no signs of ankylosis, root resorption (infection or inflammatory), and pulp necrosis. The upper right third molar had long-standing evidence of not progressive cervical external inflammatory root resorption without any clinical signs. Further research is needed to determine their long-term survival and success rates.

Autotransplatation of immature third molars as substitutes for congenitally missing second premolars: an alternative solution in a young patient with oligodontia

Quinzi, V;Panetta, G;Mummolo, S
2020-01-01

Abstract

Auto transplantation of immature donor teeth can be a strategic therapeutic solution in young patients. It is preferable to choose this approach instead of prosthetic restorations because it offers a unique and definitive solution. Orthodontic space closure is not always deemed desirable, especially in non-extraction cases (53,54). Successful auto transplantations allow alveolar growth through eruption of donor teeth together with the adjacent dentition when skeletal and dental development is not yet completed. Auto transplantation of third molars is less well-recognised and less documented. The available literature shows promising success rates. Immature donor teeth are reportedly associated with better outcomes than mature donor teeth. Aim of this case report was to analyse the short-term outcomes of auto transplantation of immature maxillary third molars to replace the missing mandibular second premolars in a 17-year-old healthy female with oligodontia. The surgical procedure was performed as a single step. Left and right lower second deciduous molars (7.5-8.5), close to exfoliation, were extracted. Donor upper third molars with developing root were extracted as a traumatically as possible and immediately placed into the surgically modified recipient sites. They were stabilized by a sectional wire. One year after surgery, the survival of both transplanted teeth was achieved. They showed periodontal health, normal mobility and continuation of root development during the follow-up period. The upper left third molar responded to all success criteria, no signs of ankylosis, root resorption (infection or inflammatory), and pulp necrosis. The upper right third molar had long-standing evidence of not progressive cervical external inflammatory root resorption without any clinical signs. Further research is needed to determine their long-term survival and success rates.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/196945
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