Short femoral stems, with preservation of the femoral bone stock, are commonly used in recent years for hip replacement in younger and more active patients. Obesity is increasingly spreading even in the younger population. The aim of this case-series study is to evaluate short stems compared to traditional hip prostheses in the obese population. A total of 77 consecutive patients with a BMI greater than or equal to 30 Kg/m(2) were enrolled in this prospective study and were divided into two groups: 49 patients have been implanted with short stems while 28 patients were implanted with traditional stems. All the patients were treated for primary osteoarthritis or avascular necrosis and all the stems were implanted by the same surgeon using a posterior approach. Clinical (Harris Hip Score-HHS, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index-WOMAC, visual analogue scale-VAS, 12-item Short Form Health Survey-SF-12) and radiographic outcomes were recorded. Radiological evaluations were carried out by three different blinded surgeons. A statistical analysis was performed (chi-square, t-test, Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test, 2-factor ANOVA). At a mean follow-up of 42.6 months both groups showed a marked improvement in pain and in the clinical scores between pre- and post-surgical procedures (p < 0.05) with no significant differences between the two groups at last follow-up (p > 0.05). The radiological evaluations, with high concordance correlation between the three blinded surgeons (ICC consistently >0.80), showed good positioning and osseointegration in all cases, with no significant differences in the restoration of the joint geometry and complications. No revisions were recorded during the follow-up period. In conclusion, short stems appear to be a good option for bone preservation even in obese patients, showing comparable results to traditional implants.

Could Short Stems THA Be a Good Bone-Saving Option Even in Obese Patients?

Saracco M.;Fidanza A.;Necozione S.;Logroscino G.
Writing – Review & Editing
2022-01-01

Abstract

Short femoral stems, with preservation of the femoral bone stock, are commonly used in recent years for hip replacement in younger and more active patients. Obesity is increasingly spreading even in the younger population. The aim of this case-series study is to evaluate short stems compared to traditional hip prostheses in the obese population. A total of 77 consecutive patients with a BMI greater than or equal to 30 Kg/m(2) were enrolled in this prospective study and were divided into two groups: 49 patients have been implanted with short stems while 28 patients were implanted with traditional stems. All the patients were treated for primary osteoarthritis or avascular necrosis and all the stems were implanted by the same surgeon using a posterior approach. Clinical (Harris Hip Score-HHS, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index-WOMAC, visual analogue scale-VAS, 12-item Short Form Health Survey-SF-12) and radiographic outcomes were recorded. Radiological evaluations were carried out by three different blinded surgeons. A statistical analysis was performed (chi-square, t-test, Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test, 2-factor ANOVA). At a mean follow-up of 42.6 months both groups showed a marked improvement in pain and in the clinical scores between pre- and post-surgical procedures (p < 0.05) with no significant differences between the two groups at last follow-up (p > 0.05). The radiological evaluations, with high concordance correlation between the three blinded surgeons (ICC consistently >0.80), showed good positioning and osseointegration in all cases, with no significant differences in the restoration of the joint geometry and complications. No revisions were recorded during the follow-up period. In conclusion, short stems appear to be a good option for bone preservation even in obese patients, showing comparable results to traditional implants.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/201305
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact