Photovoltaic (PV) systems transform solar irradiation into electricity, thereby substituting for traditional energy sources and reducing environmental pollution. The present work evaluates a developed market (Italy) in which subsidies have been re-introduced for PV plants with a nominal capacity above 20 kW through the FER1 (renewable energy sources) Decree. The discounted cash flow (DCF) methodology is applied to several cases of PV plants in public buildings, in order to determine the value of several critical variables (i.e. level of insolation, plant size, share of self-consumption, investment cost, electricity purchase price). In particular, differences in net present value (NPV) and discounted payback time (DPBT) between subsidy and no-subsidy scenarios are quantified. Break-even point (BEP) analysis is used to define the share of self-consumed energy for which NPV is positive. This share is found to range from 9 to 28% in 105 kW plants and from 10 to 35% in 25 kW plants. In addition, the results verify profitability in almost all of the baseline case studies and only half of the alternative scenarios (involving no subsidies). The estimated profits are consistent with investments aimed at increasing the share of self-consumed energy. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

The economic viability of photovoltaic systems in public buildings: Evidence from Italy

Massimo Gastaldi;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Photovoltaic (PV) systems transform solar irradiation into electricity, thereby substituting for traditional energy sources and reducing environmental pollution. The present work evaluates a developed market (Italy) in which subsidies have been re-introduced for PV plants with a nominal capacity above 20 kW through the FER1 (renewable energy sources) Decree. The discounted cash flow (DCF) methodology is applied to several cases of PV plants in public buildings, in order to determine the value of several critical variables (i.e. level of insolation, plant size, share of self-consumption, investment cost, electricity purchase price). In particular, differences in net present value (NPV) and discounted payback time (DPBT) between subsidy and no-subsidy scenarios are quantified. Break-even point (BEP) analysis is used to define the share of self-consumed energy for which NPV is positive. This share is found to range from 9 to 28% in 105 kW plants and from 10 to 35% in 25 kW plants. In addition, the results verify profitability in almost all of the baseline case studies and only half of the alternative scenarios (involving no subsidies). The estimated profits are consistent with investments aimed at increasing the share of self-consumed energy. (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/219763
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