Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults. However, limited research has been conducted on gender differences in AD. Objectives: This study aimed to assess gender differences in adult AD patients, focusing on demographic and clinical features, comorbidities and treatment approaches. Methods: In this multicentre, observational, cross-sectional study, we enrolled 686 adult patients with AD (357 males and 329 females). For each patient, we collected demographic data (age and sex), anthropometric measurements (weight, height, hip circumference, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio), clinical information (onset age, disease duration, severity, itching intensity, impact on quality of life) and noted comorbidities (metabolic, atopic and other). We recorded past and current topical and systemic treatments. We analysed all collected data using statistical techniques appropriate for both quantitative and qualitative variables. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was employed to evaluate the relationships among all clinical characteristics of the patients. Results: We found no differences in age at onset, disease duration, severity and quality of life impact between males and females. Males exhibited higher rates of hypertriglyceridaemia and hypertension. No significant gender differences were observed in atopic or other comorbidities. Treatment approaches were overlapping, except for greater methotrexate use in males. MCA revealed distinct patterns based on gender, disease severity, age of onset, treatment and quality of life. Adult males with AD had severe disease, extensive treatments and poorer quality of life, while adult females had milder disease, fewer treatments and moderate quality of life impact. Conclusions: Our study reveals that gender differences in adult AD patients are largely due to inherent population variations rather than disease-related disparities. However, it highlights potential undertreatment of females with moderate AD and quality of life impact, emphasizing the need for equitable AD treatment. JAK inhibitors may offer a solution for gender-based therapeutic parity.

Gender differences in adult atopic dermatitis and clinical implication: Results from a nationwide multicentre study

Fargnoli M. C.;
In corso di stampa

Abstract

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects both children and adults. However, limited research has been conducted on gender differences in AD. Objectives: This study aimed to assess gender differences in adult AD patients, focusing on demographic and clinical features, comorbidities and treatment approaches. Methods: In this multicentre, observational, cross-sectional study, we enrolled 686 adult patients with AD (357 males and 329 females). For each patient, we collected demographic data (age and sex), anthropometric measurements (weight, height, hip circumference, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio), clinical information (onset age, disease duration, severity, itching intensity, impact on quality of life) and noted comorbidities (metabolic, atopic and other). We recorded past and current topical and systemic treatments. We analysed all collected data using statistical techniques appropriate for both quantitative and qualitative variables. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was employed to evaluate the relationships among all clinical characteristics of the patients. Results: We found no differences in age at onset, disease duration, severity and quality of life impact between males and females. Males exhibited higher rates of hypertriglyceridaemia and hypertension. No significant gender differences were observed in atopic or other comorbidities. Treatment approaches were overlapping, except for greater methotrexate use in males. MCA revealed distinct patterns based on gender, disease severity, age of onset, treatment and quality of life. Adult males with AD had severe disease, extensive treatments and poorer quality of life, while adult females had milder disease, fewer treatments and moderate quality of life impact. Conclusions: Our study reveals that gender differences in adult AD patients are largely due to inherent population variations rather than disease-related disparities. However, it highlights potential undertreatment of females with moderate AD and quality of life impact, emphasizing the need for equitable AD treatment. JAK inhibitors may offer a solution for gender-based therapeutic parity.
In corso di stampa
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/222545
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact