ObjectivePsychosocial factors are recognised as important determinants of pain experience in patients with inflammatory arthritides. Among them, pain catastrophising, a maladaptive cognitive style, observed in patients with anxiety and depressive disorders, garnered specific attention. Here, we evaluated pain catastrophising (PC) and its related domains (Rumination, Magnification, and Helplessness), in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarhtiritis (axSpA) participants, to assess its impact on disease activity. Furthermore, we analysed possible correlations of PC-Scale (PCS) with those psychometric domains which have been already related to catastrophisation in patients with chronic pain. Lastly, we aimed to define the relationship between PCS and the different variables included in the composite indices of disease activity.Methods A multi-centre, cross-sectional, observational study has been conducted on 135 PsA (age 56 (47-64) years, males/females 40.74/59.26%; Disease Activity in Psoriasic Arthritis (DAPSA) 13.34 (5.21-22.22)) and 71 axSpA (age 49 (37-58) years, males/females 56.34/43.66%; Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Arthritis Activity (BASDAI) 4.17 (2.1-6.3)) participants. Multivariable regressions and correlations were performed to evaluate the relationship between pain catastrophising and both disease activity and patient-reported outcomes.Results The adjusted linear regression model showed a positive association between PCS and DAPSA as well as between PCS and BASDAI; PCS negative impacts on the subjective domains of disease activity scores.Conclusion This study suggests the role of PC, independently of inflammation, in disease perception and achievement of remission or low disease activity in chronic arthritides.

The negative impact of pain catastrophising on disease activity: analyses of data derived from patient-reported outcomes in psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis

Ruscitti, Piero;Cipriani, Paola;Giacomelli, Roberto;
2023-01-01

Abstract

ObjectivePsychosocial factors are recognised as important determinants of pain experience in patients with inflammatory arthritides. Among them, pain catastrophising, a maladaptive cognitive style, observed in patients with anxiety and depressive disorders, garnered specific attention. Here, we evaluated pain catastrophising (PC) and its related domains (Rumination, Magnification, and Helplessness), in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarhtiritis (axSpA) participants, to assess its impact on disease activity. Furthermore, we analysed possible correlations of PC-Scale (PCS) with those psychometric domains which have been already related to catastrophisation in patients with chronic pain. Lastly, we aimed to define the relationship between PCS and the different variables included in the composite indices of disease activity.Methods A multi-centre, cross-sectional, observational study has been conducted on 135 PsA (age 56 (47-64) years, males/females 40.74/59.26%; Disease Activity in Psoriasic Arthritis (DAPSA) 13.34 (5.21-22.22)) and 71 axSpA (age 49 (37-58) years, males/females 56.34/43.66%; Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Arthritis Activity (BASDAI) 4.17 (2.1-6.3)) participants. Multivariable regressions and correlations were performed to evaluate the relationship between pain catastrophising and both disease activity and patient-reported outcomes.Results The adjusted linear regression model showed a positive association between PCS and DAPSA as well as between PCS and BASDAI; PCS negative impacts on the subjective domains of disease activity scores.Conclusion This study suggests the role of PC, independently of inflammation, in disease perception and achievement of remission or low disease activity in chronic arthritides.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/227683
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