Objective: To assess whether dual transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance the efficacy of exoskeleton robotic training on upper limb motor functions in patients with chronic stroke. Methods: A prospective, bi-center, double-blind, randomized clinical trial study was performed. Patients with moderate-to-severe stroke (according to The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) were randomly assigned to receive dual or sham tDCS immediately before robotic therapy (10 sessions, 2 weeks). The primary outcome was the Fugl–Meyer for Upper Extremity, assessed before, after, and at the 12-week follow-up. Neurophysiological evaluation of corticospinal projections to upper limb muscles was performed by recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs). ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT03026712. Results: Two hundred and sixty individuals were tested for eligibility, of which 80 were enrolled and agreed to participate. Excluding 14 dropouts, 66 patients were randomly assigned into the 2 groups. Results showed that chronic patients were stable before treatment and significantly improved after that. The records within subject improvements were not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, a post-hoc analysis subdividing patients in 2 subgroups based on the presence or absence of MEPs at the baseline showed a significantly higher effect of real tDCS in patients without MEPs when compared to patients with MEPs (F = 4.6, P =.007). Conclusion: The adjunction of dual tDCS to robotic arm training did not further enhance recovery in the treated sample of patients with chronic stroke. However, a significant improvement in the subgroup of patients with a severe corticospinal dysfunction (as suggested by the absence of MEPs) suggests that they could benefit from such a treatment combination.

Objective: To assess whether dual transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance the efficacy of exoskeleton robotic training on upper limb motor functions in patients with chronic stroke. Methods: A prospective, bi-center, double-blind, randomized clinical trial study was performed. Patients with moderate-to-severe stroke (according to The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) were randomly assigned to receive dual or sham tDCS immediately before robotic therapy (10 sessions, 2 weeks). The primary outcome was the Fugl–Meyer for Upper Extremity, assessed before, after, and at the 12-week follow-up. Neurophysiological evaluation of corticospinal projections to upper limb muscles was performed by recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs). ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT03026712. Results: Two hundred and sixty individuals were tested for eligibility, of which 80 were enrolled and agreed to participate. Excluding 14 dropouts, 66 patients were randomly assigned into the 2 groups. Results showed that chronic patients were stable before treatment and significantly improved after that. The records within subject improvements were not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, a post-hoc analysis subdividing patients in 2 subgroups based on the presence or absence of MEPs at the baseline showed a significantly higher effect of real tDCS in patients without MEPs when compared to patients with MEPs (F = 4.6, P =.007). Conclusion: The adjunction of dual tDCS to robotic arm training did not further enhance recovery in the treated sample of patients with chronic stroke. However, a significant improvement in the subgroup of patients with a severe corticospinal dysfunction (as suggested by the absence of MEPs) suggests that they could benefit from such a treatment combination.

May Dual Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhance the Efficacy of Robot-Assisted Therapy for Promoting Upper Limb Recovery in Chronic Stroke?

Morone G.
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To assess whether dual transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance the efficacy of exoskeleton robotic training on upper limb motor functions in patients with chronic stroke. Methods: A prospective, bi-center, double-blind, randomized clinical trial study was performed. Patients with moderate-to-severe stroke (according to The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) were randomly assigned to receive dual or sham tDCS immediately before robotic therapy (10 sessions, 2 weeks). The primary outcome was the Fugl–Meyer for Upper Extremity, assessed before, after, and at the 12-week follow-up. Neurophysiological evaluation of corticospinal projections to upper limb muscles was performed by recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs). ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT03026712. Results: Two hundred and sixty individuals were tested for eligibility, of which 80 were enrolled and agreed to participate. Excluding 14 dropouts, 66 patients were randomly assigned into the 2 groups. Results showed that chronic patients were stable before treatment and significantly improved after that. The records within subject improvements were not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, a post-hoc analysis subdividing patients in 2 subgroups based on the presence or absence of MEPs at the baseline showed a significantly higher effect of real tDCS in patients without MEPs when compared to patients with MEPs (F = 4.6, P =.007). Conclusion: The adjunction of dual tDCS to robotic arm training did not further enhance recovery in the treated sample of patients with chronic stroke. However, a significant improvement in the subgroup of patients with a severe corticospinal dysfunction (as suggested by the absence of MEPs) suggests that they could benefit from such a treatment combination.
2022
Objective: To assess whether dual transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may enhance the efficacy of exoskeleton robotic training on upper limb motor functions in patients with chronic stroke. Methods: A prospective, bi-center, double-blind, randomized clinical trial study was performed. Patients with moderate-to-severe stroke (according to The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale) were randomly assigned to receive dual or sham tDCS immediately before robotic therapy (10 sessions, 2 weeks). The primary outcome was the Fugl–Meyer for Upper Extremity, assessed before, after, and at the 12-week follow-up. Neurophysiological evaluation of corticospinal projections to upper limb muscles was performed by recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs). ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT03026712. Results: Two hundred and sixty individuals were tested for eligibility, of which 80 were enrolled and agreed to participate. Excluding 14 dropouts, 66 patients were randomly assigned into the 2 groups. Results showed that chronic patients were stable before treatment and significantly improved after that. The records within subject improvements were not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, a post-hoc analysis subdividing patients in 2 subgroups based on the presence or absence of MEPs at the baseline showed a significantly higher effect of real tDCS in patients without MEPs when compared to patients with MEPs (F = 4.6, P =.007). Conclusion: The adjunction of dual tDCS to robotic arm training did not further enhance recovery in the treated sample of patients with chronic stroke. However, a significant improvement in the subgroup of patients with a severe corticospinal dysfunction (as suggested by the absence of MEPs) suggests that they could benefit from such a treatment combination.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/235662
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