BackgroundProximal humeral fractures (PHFs) are still controversial with regards to treatment and are difficult to classify. The study's objective is to show that preoperative planning performed while handling a three-dimensional (3D) printed anatomical model of the fracture can ensure a better understanding of trauma for both surgeons and patients.Materials and methodsTwenty patients (group A, cases) with complex PHF were evaluated preoperatively by reproducing life-size, full-touch 3D anatomical models. Intraoperative blood loss, radiographic controls, duration of surgery, and clinical outcomes of patients in group A were compared with 20 patients (group B, controls) who underwent standard preoperative evaluation. Additionally, senior surgeons and residents, as well as group A patients, answered a questionnaire to evaluate innovative preoperative planning and patient compliance. Cost analysis was evaluated.ResultsIntraoperative radiography controls and length of operation were significantly shorter in group A. There were no differences in clinical outcomes or blood loss. Patients claim a better understanding of the trauma suffered and the proposed treatment. Surgeons assert that the planning of the definitive operation with 3D models has had a good impact. The development of this tool has been well received by the residents. The surgery was reduced in length by 15%, resulting in savings of about EUR 400 for each intervention.ConclusionsFewer intraoperative radiography checks, shorter surgeries, and better patient compliance reduce radiation exposure for patients and healthcare staff, enhance surgical outcomes while reducing expenses, and lower the risk of medicolegal claims.Level of evidenceLevel I, prospective randomized case-control study.

Three-dimensional printed models can reduce costs and surgical time for complex proximal humeral fractures: preoperative planning, patient satisfaction, and improved resident skills

Fidanza A.;Di Petrillo F.;Logroscino G.
Writing – Review & Editing
2024-01-01

Abstract

BackgroundProximal humeral fractures (PHFs) are still controversial with regards to treatment and are difficult to classify. The study's objective is to show that preoperative planning performed while handling a three-dimensional (3D) printed anatomical model of the fracture can ensure a better understanding of trauma for both surgeons and patients.Materials and methodsTwenty patients (group A, cases) with complex PHF were evaluated preoperatively by reproducing life-size, full-touch 3D anatomical models. Intraoperative blood loss, radiographic controls, duration of surgery, and clinical outcomes of patients in group A were compared with 20 patients (group B, controls) who underwent standard preoperative evaluation. Additionally, senior surgeons and residents, as well as group A patients, answered a questionnaire to evaluate innovative preoperative planning and patient compliance. Cost analysis was evaluated.ResultsIntraoperative radiography controls and length of operation were significantly shorter in group A. There were no differences in clinical outcomes or blood loss. Patients claim a better understanding of the trauma suffered and the proposed treatment. Surgeons assert that the planning of the definitive operation with 3D models has had a good impact. The development of this tool has been well received by the residents. The surgery was reduced in length by 15%, resulting in savings of about EUR 400 for each intervention.ConclusionsFewer intraoperative radiography checks, shorter surgeries, and better patient compliance reduce radiation exposure for patients and healthcare staff, enhance surgical outcomes while reducing expenses, and lower the risk of medicolegal claims.Level of evidenceLevel I, prospective randomized case-control study.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/235859
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