Last decades physical activity levels decreased dramatically in children all over the European countries. As consequence there was a rising appearance of risk factors and pathologic conditions in young such as overweight and obesity, increased blood pressure, unhealthy lipidic profile, diabetes, bone weakness, eating disorders, anxiety. As other behaviours, physical activity involvement is determined by and has influence on psychological and social factors, especially in certain subgroups more at risk such as obese children: self-efficacy, self-competence, social norms, social support, selfesteem, enjoyment, self-image. Our study is aimed to explore the difference between obese and non-obese children in psycho-social determinants modifiable by means of effective interventions. A cross-sectional study, carried out during 2010 in Abruzzo Region (Italy), collected data on 169 pupils 8-9 years old: anthropometric measures, physical activity habits, motor tests, psychosocial characteristics. These last variables, assessed by means of self-report questionnaire validated with a test-retest procedure, were compared with outcomes variables using Wilcoxon test and test for trend for statistical significance of differences. The results showed significant differences in self-efficacy, self-competence and enjoyment in respect to weight status, being those all higher in non-obese. The organized sport involvement seems to correspond in higher self-esteem and enjoyment and a more positive familiar support. Finally, better motor performance seems related to higher level of self-perceived physical competence and self-efficacy. Our study confirmed the relevance of psycho-social determinants of physical activity behaviours in children both for mental development (e.g. self-esteem) and for chronic diseases risk reduction later in their life.

Psychosocial variables, physical activity and obesity in Italian children.

SCATIGNA, MARIA;CARNICELLI, VERONICA
2011-01-01

Abstract

Last decades physical activity levels decreased dramatically in children all over the European countries. As consequence there was a rising appearance of risk factors and pathologic conditions in young such as overweight and obesity, increased blood pressure, unhealthy lipidic profile, diabetes, bone weakness, eating disorders, anxiety. As other behaviours, physical activity involvement is determined by and has influence on psychological and social factors, especially in certain subgroups more at risk such as obese children: self-efficacy, self-competence, social norms, social support, selfesteem, enjoyment, self-image. Our study is aimed to explore the difference between obese and non-obese children in psycho-social determinants modifiable by means of effective interventions. A cross-sectional study, carried out during 2010 in Abruzzo Region (Italy), collected data on 169 pupils 8-9 years old: anthropometric measures, physical activity habits, motor tests, psychosocial characteristics. These last variables, assessed by means of self-report questionnaire validated with a test-retest procedure, were compared with outcomes variables using Wilcoxon test and test for trend for statistical significance of differences. The results showed significant differences in self-efficacy, self-competence and enjoyment in respect to weight status, being those all higher in non-obese. The organized sport involvement seems to correspond in higher self-esteem and enjoyment and a more positive familiar support. Finally, better motor performance seems related to higher level of self-perceived physical competence and self-efficacy. Our study confirmed the relevance of psycho-social determinants of physical activity behaviours in children both for mental development (e.g. self-esteem) and for chronic diseases risk reduction later in their life.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/34277
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact