L'Aquila city was struck down by a 6.3 Mw earthquake in 2009 April 6th. Its historical centre and all the surrounding suburbs were severely damaged, causing 309 casualties, and more than 1500 people injured. L'Aquila has been the first Italian important city directly destroyed by a near fault earthquake since Messina earthquake (1908). Many buildings collapsed completely, both in masonry structure and in reinforced concrete ones. This work analyse the most relevant collapses of many buildings, the relevant causes of the collapse, the lack in design, construction and maintenance of the buildings (both of public interest or private ones), and the impact the collapses have caused to the urban centre. Many important buildings and structures have not been totally collapsed, and the application of the most innovative repair and seismic retrofitting techniques are applied in order to restore them, especially those with historical and artistic relevance. The first Italian application of seismic isolation to masonry and monumental buildings have been studied, and a combination of both seismic isolation and tunnelling techniques are analysed and developed in order to repair and seismically retrofit some important monumental building in the historical centre of the city. Several application of retrofitting seismic isolation to existing and severely damaged buildings are shown, concerning building uplifting, pillar cut and underpinning structures. Energy dissipation techniques are applied as an alternative tool to seismic isolation in those particular buildings where energy dissipation has been coupled with displacement control. A particular reference has been made for the monumental buildings with stone masonry where the need to preserve the historical environment results in difficult agreement with seismic safety.

STRUCTURAL FAULTS AND INNOVATIVE REPAIR TECHNIQUES IN THE BUILDINGS DAMAGED IN THE L'AQUILA 2009 EARTHQUAKE

SALVATORI, ANTONELLO
2014-01-01

Abstract

L'Aquila city was struck down by a 6.3 Mw earthquake in 2009 April 6th. Its historical centre and all the surrounding suburbs were severely damaged, causing 309 casualties, and more than 1500 people injured. L'Aquila has been the first Italian important city directly destroyed by a near fault earthquake since Messina earthquake (1908). Many buildings collapsed completely, both in masonry structure and in reinforced concrete ones. This work analyse the most relevant collapses of many buildings, the relevant causes of the collapse, the lack in design, construction and maintenance of the buildings (both of public interest or private ones), and the impact the collapses have caused to the urban centre. Many important buildings and structures have not been totally collapsed, and the application of the most innovative repair and seismic retrofitting techniques are applied in order to restore them, especially those with historical and artistic relevance. The first Italian application of seismic isolation to masonry and monumental buildings have been studied, and a combination of both seismic isolation and tunnelling techniques are analysed and developed in order to repair and seismically retrofit some important monumental building in the historical centre of the city. Several application of retrofitting seismic isolation to existing and severely damaged buildings are shown, concerning building uplifting, pillar cut and underpinning structures. Energy dissipation techniques are applied as an alternative tool to seismic isolation in those particular buildings where energy dissipation has been coupled with displacement control. A particular reference has been made for the monumental buildings with stone masonry where the need to preserve the historical environment results in difficult agreement with seismic safety.
0-947-664-76-8
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/36588
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact