Background. The severity of clinical activity of Crohn’s disease is high during the first year after diagnosis and decreases thereafter. Approximately 50% of patients require steroids and immunosuppressants and 75% need surgery during their lifetime. The clinical course of patients with Crohn’s disease first diagnosed at surgery has never been investigated. Aim. To assess the clinical course of Crohn’s disease first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen and to evaluate the need for medical and surgical treatment in this subset of patients. Patients and methods. Hospital clinical records of 490 consecutive Crohn’s disease patients were reviewed. Patients were classified according to the Vienna criteria. Sex, extraintestinal manifestations, family history of inflammatory bowel diseases, appendectomy, smoking habit and medical/surgical treatments performed during the follow-up period were assessed. Statistical analysis: Kaplan–Meier survival method and Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results. Of the 490 Crohn’s disease patients, 115 had diagnosis of Crohn’s disease at surgery for acute abdomen (Group A) and 375 by conventional clinical, radiological, endoscopic and histologic criteria (Group B). Patients in Group A showed a low risk of further surgery (Log Rank test p < 0.001) and a longer time interval between diagnosis and first operation compared to Group B (10.8 years vs. 5.8 years, p < 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, patients in Group A used less steroids and immunosuppressants (OR 0.3, p < 0.0001; OR 0.6, p < 0.004, respectively). Conclusions. Crohn’s disease patients first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen showed a low risk for reintervention and less use of steroids and immunosuppressants during follow-up than those not operated upon at diagnosis. Early surgery may represent a valid approach in the initial management of patients with Crohn’s disease, at least in the subset of patients with ileal and complicated disease.

Clinical course of Crohn's disease first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen.

LATELLA, GIOVANNI;VISCIDO, Angelo;NECOZIONE, STEFANO
2009

Abstract

Background. The severity of clinical activity of Crohn’s disease is high during the first year after diagnosis and decreases thereafter. Approximately 50% of patients require steroids and immunosuppressants and 75% need surgery during their lifetime. The clinical course of patients with Crohn’s disease first diagnosed at surgery has never been investigated. Aim. To assess the clinical course of Crohn’s disease first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen and to evaluate the need for medical and surgical treatment in this subset of patients. Patients and methods. Hospital clinical records of 490 consecutive Crohn’s disease patients were reviewed. Patients were classified according to the Vienna criteria. Sex, extraintestinal manifestations, family history of inflammatory bowel diseases, appendectomy, smoking habit and medical/surgical treatments performed during the follow-up period were assessed. Statistical analysis: Kaplan–Meier survival method and Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results. Of the 490 Crohn’s disease patients, 115 had diagnosis of Crohn’s disease at surgery for acute abdomen (Group A) and 375 by conventional clinical, radiological, endoscopic and histologic criteria (Group B). Patients in Group A showed a low risk of further surgery (Log Rank test p < 0.001) and a longer time interval between diagnosis and first operation compared to Group B (10.8 years vs. 5.8 years, p < 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, patients in Group A used less steroids and immunosuppressants (OR 0.3, p < 0.0001; OR 0.6, p < 0.004, respectively). Conclusions. Crohn’s disease patients first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen showed a low risk for reintervention and less use of steroids and immunosuppressants during follow-up than those not operated upon at diagnosis. Early surgery may represent a valid approach in the initial management of patients with Crohn’s disease, at least in the subset of patients with ileal and complicated disease.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/4826
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 43
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 37
social impact