This manuscript reviews the outcomes of invasive and minimally-invasive treatments of lower urinary tract symptoms due to prostatic enlargement. Methods: The MEDLINE database was searched for Medical Subject headings and text words including prostatic hyperplasia, treatment, surgery, thermal treatments, thermotherapy, laser, TUNA and vaportrode. Data from both randomised and non-randomised controlled trials were considered. Results: All invasive treatments produce significant changes of all subjective and objective outcome parameters. The best clinical outcome has been reported for open prostatectomy followed by transurethral resection of the prostate. Complications of the different invasive techniques were difficult to analyse because of the heterogeneity of categories among different papers and lack of standard criteria. The major attraction of all minimally invasive treatment options is the low risk of bleeding requiring blood transfusions. Retrograde ejaculation was one of the most frequently reported complications for all invasive techniques. Some of the so-called less invasive treatment options appeared to be associated with a rather high incidence of minor compli-cations somehow contradicting their minimally invasiveness. Re-treatment rate observed in patients receiving various minimally invasive treatments was always higher than following standard treatment options such as transurethral resection. Conclusions: Open prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate outperform all minimally invasive treatment modalities as regards efficacy and durability of outcome. The lack of standard criteria to evaluate complications and side effects makes treatment comparisons difficult. Endorsement of the clinical research criteria proposed by the last WHO-sponsored International Consultation on BPH is strongly recommended to improve the clinical value of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. More information is needed on long-term complications and cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment modalities. Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Invasive and minimally invasive treatment modalities for lower urinary tract symptoms: What are the relevant differences in randomised controlled trials?

VICENTINI, Carlo;
2000

Abstract

This manuscript reviews the outcomes of invasive and minimally-invasive treatments of lower urinary tract symptoms due to prostatic enlargement. Methods: The MEDLINE database was searched for Medical Subject headings and text words including prostatic hyperplasia, treatment, surgery, thermal treatments, thermotherapy, laser, TUNA and vaportrode. Data from both randomised and non-randomised controlled trials were considered. Results: All invasive treatments produce significant changes of all subjective and objective outcome parameters. The best clinical outcome has been reported for open prostatectomy followed by transurethral resection of the prostate. Complications of the different invasive techniques were difficult to analyse because of the heterogeneity of categories among different papers and lack of standard criteria. The major attraction of all minimally invasive treatment options is the low risk of bleeding requiring blood transfusions. Retrograde ejaculation was one of the most frequently reported complications for all invasive techniques. Some of the so-called less invasive treatment options appeared to be associated with a rather high incidence of minor compli-cations somehow contradicting their minimally invasiveness. Re-treatment rate observed in patients receiving various minimally invasive treatments was always higher than following standard treatment options such as transurethral resection. Conclusions: Open prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate outperform all minimally invasive treatment modalities as regards efficacy and durability of outcome. The lack of standard criteria to evaluate complications and side effects makes treatment comparisons difficult. Endorsement of the clinical research criteria proposed by the last WHO-sponsored International Consultation on BPH is strongly recommended to improve the clinical value of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. More information is needed on long-term complications and cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive treatment modalities. Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/8824
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