According to the peak and decline model diver- gent thinking declines at a specific age (in or after middle age). However, if divergent thinking declines steadily in aging still has to be clarified. In order to explore the age- related changes in verbal and visual divergent thinking, in the present study a sample of 159 participants was divided in five age groups: young adults (18–35 years), middle- aged adults (36–55), young old (56–74), old (75–85) and the oldest-old (86–98). Two divergent thinking tasks were administered: the alternative uses for cardboard boxes, aimed at assessing verbal ideational fluency, flexibility and originality; the completion drawing task, aimed at assess- ing visual ideational fluency, flexibility and originality. Results showed that after peaking in the young adult group (20–35 years) all components of verbal and visual diver- gent thinking stabilized in the middle-aged adult group (36–55 years) and then started declining in the young old group (56–75). Interestingly, all components were found to be preserved after declining. Yet, verbal and visual diver- gent thinking were found at the same extent across age groups, with the exception of visual ideational fluency, that was higher in the young old group, the old group and the oldest-old group than verbal ideational fluency. These results support the idea that divergent thinking does not decline steadily in the elderly. Given that older people can preserve to some extent verbal and visual divergent think- ing, these findings have important implications for active aging, that is, divergent thinking might be fostered in aging in order to prevent the cognitive decline.

Verbal and visual divergent thinking in aging

Palmiero, Massimiliano;PICCARDI, LAURA
2017

Abstract

According to the peak and decline model diver- gent thinking declines at a specific age (in or after middle age). However, if divergent thinking declines steadily in aging still has to be clarified. In order to explore the age- related changes in verbal and visual divergent thinking, in the present study a sample of 159 participants was divided in five age groups: young adults (18–35 years), middle- aged adults (36–55), young old (56–74), old (75–85) and the oldest-old (86–98). Two divergent thinking tasks were administered: the alternative uses for cardboard boxes, aimed at assessing verbal ideational fluency, flexibility and originality; the completion drawing task, aimed at assess- ing visual ideational fluency, flexibility and originality. Results showed that after peaking in the young adult group (20–35 years) all components of verbal and visual diver- gent thinking stabilized in the middle-aged adult group (36–55 years) and then started declining in the young old group (56–75). Interestingly, all components were found to be preserved after declining. Yet, verbal and visual diver- gent thinking were found at the same extent across age groups, with the exception of visual ideational fluency, that was higher in the young old group, the old group and the oldest-old group than verbal ideational fluency. These results support the idea that divergent thinking does not decline steadily in the elderly. Given that older people can preserve to some extent verbal and visual divergent think- ing, these findings have important implications for active aging, that is, divergent thinking might be fostered in aging in order to prevent the cognitive decline.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11697/108654
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