Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a process that has become an essential reference in the AEC architecture, engineering and construction sector (BIM Toolkit 2014-15; EUBIM Taskgroup, 2017; 2014/24/EU; UNI 11337:2017). The reasons for this growing interest are due to its undisputed potential as a control upon the entire process of new building design, construction, maintenance, management, and disposal. Thanks to parametric objects enriched with both qualitative and quantitative information, BIM led to the development of a new way of working: a process based on real time interaction between all stages of the building process, where the BIM informative model is the inter-operable shared 3D interface that enables architectural, structural and systems computing. However, historical buildings are the result of modification and stratification processes carried out over time. They are the witnesses of historical events and of cultures that have occurred over the centuries; therefore they embody tangible and intangible values. The study of architectural heritage is based on an history-critical methodological approach. The survey of the building plays an essential role: according to archival documentation, and geometrical and constructive analysis, interpretative models describe the architectural, historical, and material characteristics. This different methodological approach to architectural heritage is not fully supported by BIM software and platforms, designed to manage processes for new buildings. Therefore, the study of the potential offered by BIM for documentation, conservation, interpretation, presentation, enhancement, maintenance, management, and restoration design is an open field. In recent years, many studies used BIM applied to existing buildings, and the wording HBIM (intended both as Historical BIM or Heritage BIM) has emerged and is currently used. The main issues that need studying relate to: exhaustive and economic as-built 3D modeling of historic settlements (often with complex shapes) from point clouds; modeling architectural and constructive elements realized with craft procedures; their parametrization and computing into BIM environments; implementing historical databases. In conclusion, the HBIM procedure requires a different theoretical–methodological approach from the original BIM. Architectural heritage (from ancient times to the recent past), constitutes a large part of the world's built heritage. BIM offers a potential operative and methodological revolution in building studies and design, therefore defining solutions, workflows, protocols, and best practices for HBIM is not only a current hot topic but also a necessity. Topics: HBIM modeling from point clouds; HBIM objects, semantization; HBIM objects, levels of development; HBIM parametric and visual programming; HBIM databases; HBIM interoperability; HBIM transparency of information; HBIM reliability of geometry and information; HBIM procedures; HBIM standards; HBIM for conservation, restoration, maintenance, management, and enhancement. Prof. Stefano Brusaporci Dr. Pamela Maiezza Dr. Alessandra Tata Guest Editors

Heritage Building Information Modeling (HBIM)

S. Brusaporci
;
P. Maiezza
;
A. Tata
2019

Abstract

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is a process that has become an essential reference in the AEC architecture, engineering and construction sector (BIM Toolkit 2014-15; EUBIM Taskgroup, 2017; 2014/24/EU; UNI 11337:2017). The reasons for this growing interest are due to its undisputed potential as a control upon the entire process of new building design, construction, maintenance, management, and disposal. Thanks to parametric objects enriched with both qualitative and quantitative information, BIM led to the development of a new way of working: a process based on real time interaction between all stages of the building process, where the BIM informative model is the inter-operable shared 3D interface that enables architectural, structural and systems computing. However, historical buildings are the result of modification and stratification processes carried out over time. They are the witnesses of historical events and of cultures that have occurred over the centuries; therefore they embody tangible and intangible values. The study of architectural heritage is based on an history-critical methodological approach. The survey of the building plays an essential role: according to archival documentation, and geometrical and constructive analysis, interpretative models describe the architectural, historical, and material characteristics. This different methodological approach to architectural heritage is not fully supported by BIM software and platforms, designed to manage processes for new buildings. Therefore, the study of the potential offered by BIM for documentation, conservation, interpretation, presentation, enhancement, maintenance, management, and restoration design is an open field. In recent years, many studies used BIM applied to existing buildings, and the wording HBIM (intended both as Historical BIM or Heritage BIM) has emerged and is currently used. The main issues that need studying relate to: exhaustive and economic as-built 3D modeling of historic settlements (often with complex shapes) from point clouds; modeling architectural and constructive elements realized with craft procedures; their parametrization and computing into BIM environments; implementing historical databases. In conclusion, the HBIM procedure requires a different theoretical–methodological approach from the original BIM. Architectural heritage (from ancient times to the recent past), constitutes a large part of the world's built heritage. BIM offers a potential operative and methodological revolution in building studies and design, therefore defining solutions, workflows, protocols, and best practices for HBIM is not only a current hot topic but also a necessity. Topics: HBIM modeling from point clouds; HBIM objects, semantization; HBIM objects, levels of development; HBIM parametric and visual programming; HBIM databases; HBIM interoperability; HBIM transparency of information; HBIM reliability of geometry and information; HBIM procedures; HBIM standards; HBIM for conservation, restoration, maintenance, management, and enhancement. Prof. Stefano Brusaporci Dr. Pamela Maiezza Dr. Alessandra Tata Guest Editors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/137560
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