The paper proposes a change of perspective on the role of commissioning, contrasting the current ‘static’ idea with a ‘diachronic’ vision of it (which considers both the initial client and the subsequent “owners and holders” who transmit an object to the future). This vision corresponds more to the history of buildings characterized by complex constructive events and highlights the central role of ‘transmission’ with its responsibilities. Consequently, the reference to ethics in conservation is explicit and also the possible conflicts between public interest (e.g. the right to public use or, more generally, the “right to cultural heritage”, as referred to in the Faro Convention) and private interests (linked to contingent circumstances). The term ‘interest’ generally leads to consider above all monetary revenues –hence the economic sustainability of conservation– neglecting the concept of “public good” (regardless of the assets ownership) and the related issues, such as the general ‘need’ of culture and its positive effects on civil development and quality of life. Furthermore, the conservation of architecture is conditioned by circumstances related to the current use of buildings, which are often considered only as containers of functions (or, at best, of works of art). On the contrary, today it is still essential to underline that the historical building bears other meanings and values, so it’s important to make the current clients (and the ‘stakeholders’ in general) aware of the responsibilities that cultural heritage implies. The actual post-seismic reconstructions highlight the priority given to private interests and the recovery of functionality, to the detriment of knowledge and understanding of the meaning of places on which one intervenes. With reference to similar experiences, the paper proposes a new figure of ‘client’ answering for the protection of public interest more than for interests linked to contingent factors, which tend to neglect the transmission of cultural inheritance.

Committenza privata e interesse pubblico: la ricerca di un difficile equilibrio

carla Bartolomucci
2020-01-01

Abstract

The paper proposes a change of perspective on the role of commissioning, contrasting the current ‘static’ idea with a ‘diachronic’ vision of it (which considers both the initial client and the subsequent “owners and holders” who transmit an object to the future). This vision corresponds more to the history of buildings characterized by complex constructive events and highlights the central role of ‘transmission’ with its responsibilities. Consequently, the reference to ethics in conservation is explicit and also the possible conflicts between public interest (e.g. the right to public use or, more generally, the “right to cultural heritage”, as referred to in the Faro Convention) and private interests (linked to contingent circumstances). The term ‘interest’ generally leads to consider above all monetary revenues –hence the economic sustainability of conservation– neglecting the concept of “public good” (regardless of the assets ownership) and the related issues, such as the general ‘need’ of culture and its positive effects on civil development and quality of life. Furthermore, the conservation of architecture is conditioned by circumstances related to the current use of buildings, which are often considered only as containers of functions (or, at best, of works of art). On the contrary, today it is still essential to underline that the historical building bears other meanings and values, so it’s important to make the current clients (and the ‘stakeholders’ in general) aware of the responsibilities that cultural heritage implies. The actual post-seismic reconstructions highlight the priority given to private interests and the recovery of functionality, to the detriment of knowledge and understanding of the meaning of places on which one intervenes. With reference to similar experiences, the paper proposes a new figure of ‘client’ answering for the protection of public interest more than for interests linked to contingent factors, which tend to neglect the transmission of cultural inheritance.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/144586
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