Background: The best application modality of high-fidelity simulation in graduate critical care nursing courses is still rarely investigated in nursing research. This is an important issue since advanced nursing skills are necessary to effectively respond to critically ill patients’ care needs. The aim of the study was to examine the influence of a modified teaching model based on multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations on both the learning outcomes and the perceptions of graduate students enrolled in a critical care nursing course. Methods: A multimethod study involving a sample of graduate critical care nursing students was conducted. A theoretical teaching model focused on multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations is currently applied as a teaching method in an Italian critical care nursing course. According to the Kirkpatrick model for evaluating training programs, the performance, self-efficacy, and self-confidence in managing critically ill patients were considered learning outcomes, while satisfaction with learning and students’ lived experiences during the experimental phases were considered students’ perceptions. Results: Multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations significantly improved performance, self-efficacy, and self-confidence in managing virtual critically ill patients’ care needs. The satisfaction level was high, while lived experiences of participants were positive and allowed for better explanation of quantitative results of this study. Conclusions: Multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations can be considered a valuable teaching method that can improve the learning outcomes of graduate nurses enrolled in an intensive care course.

Dose–Response Relationship between High-Fidelity Simulation and Intensive Care Nursing Students’ Learning Outcomes: An Italian Multimethod Study

Dante A.;Caponnetto V.;Masotta V.;Marcotullio A.;Bertocchi L.;Petrucci C.;Lancia L.
2022

Abstract

Background: The best application modality of high-fidelity simulation in graduate critical care nursing courses is still rarely investigated in nursing research. This is an important issue since advanced nursing skills are necessary to effectively respond to critically ill patients’ care needs. The aim of the study was to examine the influence of a modified teaching model based on multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations on both the learning outcomes and the perceptions of graduate students enrolled in a critical care nursing course. Methods: A multimethod study involving a sample of graduate critical care nursing students was conducted. A theoretical teaching model focused on multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations is currently applied as a teaching method in an Italian critical care nursing course. According to the Kirkpatrick model for evaluating training programs, the performance, self-efficacy, and self-confidence in managing critically ill patients were considered learning outcomes, while satisfaction with learning and students’ lived experiences during the experimental phases were considered students’ perceptions. Results: Multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations significantly improved performance, self-efficacy, and self-confidence in managing virtual critically ill patients’ care needs. The satisfaction level was high, while lived experiences of participants were positive and allowed for better explanation of quantitative results of this study. Conclusions: Multiple exposures to high-fidelity simulations can be considered a valuable teaching method that can improve the learning outcomes of graduate nurses enrolled in an intensive care course.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/175854
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