In the context of sleep disturbances, increasing evidence suggests a critical role of sleep-related dysfunctional metacognitive activity, including metacognitive control of intrusive thoughts in the pre-sleep period. Although the relationship between sleep-related thought-control strategies and poor sleep quality is well recognized, the possible contribution of general metacognitive functioning within this relation is still unclear. In this study, we performed a mediation analysis to examine the role of thought-control strategies on the relationship between metacognitive abilities and sleep quality in individuals with different self-reported sleep characteristics. Two-hundred and forty-five individuals participated in the study. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Thought Control Questionnaire Insomnia-Revised, and the Metacognition Self-Assessment Scale to evaluate sleep quality, thought-control strategies and metacognitive functions, respectively. The results showed that worry strategy in the pre-sleep period mediates the relationship between metacognitive functions and sleep quality. Particularly, the ability to understand one's mental states and mastery functions could be the two metacognitive domains primarily involved in the dysfunctional metacognitive thought-control activity responsible for reduced sleep quality. The observed effect suggests that inadequate metacognitive functioning is associated with poor sleep quality in healthy subjects via the mediation of dysfunctional worry strategy. These findings suggest the potential relevance of clinical interventions to enhance specific metacognitive abilities, with the aim to promote more functional strategies for managing cognitive and emotional processes during the pre-sleep period.

The relationships among metacognitive functions, sleep-related thought-control strategies and sleep quality: A mediation analysis

Socci, Valentina;Pino, Maria Chiara;D'Aurizio, Giulia;Ferrara, Michele;Tempesta, Daniela
2024-01-01

Abstract

In the context of sleep disturbances, increasing evidence suggests a critical role of sleep-related dysfunctional metacognitive activity, including metacognitive control of intrusive thoughts in the pre-sleep period. Although the relationship between sleep-related thought-control strategies and poor sleep quality is well recognized, the possible contribution of general metacognitive functioning within this relation is still unclear. In this study, we performed a mediation analysis to examine the role of thought-control strategies on the relationship between metacognitive abilities and sleep quality in individuals with different self-reported sleep characteristics. Two-hundred and forty-five individuals participated in the study. Participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Thought Control Questionnaire Insomnia-Revised, and the Metacognition Self-Assessment Scale to evaluate sleep quality, thought-control strategies and metacognitive functions, respectively. The results showed that worry strategy in the pre-sleep period mediates the relationship between metacognitive functions and sleep quality. Particularly, the ability to understand one's mental states and mastery functions could be the two metacognitive domains primarily involved in the dysfunctional metacognitive thought-control activity responsible for reduced sleep quality. The observed effect suggests that inadequate metacognitive functioning is associated with poor sleep quality in healthy subjects via the mediation of dysfunctional worry strategy. These findings suggest the potential relevance of clinical interventions to enhance specific metacognitive abilities, with the aim to promote more functional strategies for managing cognitive and emotional processes during the pre-sleep period.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/205299
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