". The new understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transformation process and tumor progression, and recognition of oncogenes and proteins involved in regulating these processes, has opened a new era in diagnostic formulation and clinical evaluation of new drugs. The proteins that regulate proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cell invasiveness are the basis of leukemogenesis and are the target of this new therapeutic approach (targeted therapy). The study of some aspects of molecular biology, such as growth factors, molecules involved in signal transduction, angiogenesis, apoptosis, invasiveness, and cell cycle has allowed the identification of new drug targets that interfere with key events of leukemogenesis. Like normal hematopoietic cells, most of the leukemic cells use multiple intracellular signaling pathways to ensure the maintenance of critical functions and activities for their own survival, and these signaling pathways are potential targets for new forms of targeted therapy.. . Several novel targeted therapies have recently emerged as active in the treatment of leukemia, including monoclonal antibodies, small molecules that inhibit critical signaling pathways, proapoptotic agents, or modulators of the leukemia microenvironment. Other new agents target novel discovered cell surface receptors or promote DNA damage. Some of these innovative drugs are now commonly used to treat certain leukemias, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia and promyelocytic leukemia. The new lines of research are directed to the identification of pharmacological agents (targeted therapy) that can interfere selectively against specific molecular targets to increase the selectivity of the target and reduce systemic side effects.. "

Leukemias (chapter 6)

GINALDI, Lia;DE MARTINIS, MASSIMO MARIA MARCELLO
2012-01-01

Abstract

". The new understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transformation process and tumor progression, and recognition of oncogenes and proteins involved in regulating these processes, has opened a new era in diagnostic formulation and clinical evaluation of new drugs. The proteins that regulate proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cell invasiveness are the basis of leukemogenesis and are the target of this new therapeutic approach (targeted therapy). The study of some aspects of molecular biology, such as growth factors, molecules involved in signal transduction, angiogenesis, apoptosis, invasiveness, and cell cycle has allowed the identification of new drug targets that interfere with key events of leukemogenesis. Like normal hematopoietic cells, most of the leukemic cells use multiple intracellular signaling pathways to ensure the maintenance of critical functions and activities for their own survival, and these signaling pathways are potential targets for new forms of targeted therapy.. . Several novel targeted therapies have recently emerged as active in the treatment of leukemia, including monoclonal antibodies, small molecules that inhibit critical signaling pathways, proapoptotic agents, or modulators of the leukemia microenvironment. Other new agents target novel discovered cell surface receptors or promote DNA damage. Some of these innovative drugs are now commonly used to treat certain leukemias, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia and promyelocytic leukemia. The new lines of research are directed to the identification of pharmacological agents (targeted therapy) that can interfere selectively against specific molecular targets to increase the selectivity of the target and reduce systemic side effects.. "
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11697/89114
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact